Bio

Bio


Zeshaan N. Maan received his Medical Degree from King's College London followed by a Masters from Imperial College London. Dr. Maan completed Core Surgical Training in the UK, gaining Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons, before accepting a position as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine under the mentorship of Geoffrey C. Gurtner, MD and Michael T. Longaker, MD. He will be starting as an intern in the Stanford Plastic Surgery Residency Program in June 2015 and expects to finish his training in 2022.

Honors & Awards


  • TRAM Pilot Grant, Stanford Translation Research and Applied Medicine Program (Oct 2014 - Oct 2015)
  • PSF Research Fellowship Grant, The Plastic Surgery Foundation (July 2014 - July 2015)
  • Excellence in Research Award, American College of Surgeons (2014)
  • Best Scientific Research Presentation, Stanford University Department of Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery (2014)
  • MBBS with Merit, Kings College London (2008)

Professional Education


  • Certificate, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Global Innovations Program: Ignite (2013)
  • Master of Science, Imperial College London (2011)
  • MRCS, Royal College of Surgeons of England, Surgery (2011)
  • B of Medicine and B of Surgery, University Of London (2008)

Stanford Advisors


Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Stem Cell Biology
Cell Signalling
Cell Transcription
Epimorphic Regeneration

Lab Affiliations


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Live Fibroblast Harvest Reveals Surface Marker Shift In Vitro TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS Walmsley, G. G., Rinkevich, Y., Hu, M. S., Montoro, D. T., Lo, D. D., McArdle, A., Maan, Z. N., Morrison, S. D., Duscher, D., Whittam, A. J., Wong, V. W., Weissman, I. L., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T. 2015; 21 (3): 314-321

    Abstract

    Current methods for the isolation of fibroblasts require extended ex vivo manipulation in cell culture. As a consequence, prior studies investigating fibroblast biology may fail to adequately represent cellular phenotypes in vivo. To overcome this problem, we describe a detailed protocol for the isolation of fibroblasts from the dorsal dermis of adult mice that bypasses the need for cell culture, thereby preserving the physiological, transcriptional, and proteomic profiles of each cell. Using the described protocol we characterized the transcriptional programs and the surface expression of 176 CD markers in cultured versus uncultured fibroblasts. The differential expression patterns we observed highlight the importance of a live harvest for investigations of fibroblast biology.

    View details for DOI 10.1089/ten.tec.2014.0118

    View details for Web of Science ID 000350043400009

    View details for PubMedID 25275778

  • Scarless wound healing: chasing the holy grail. Plastic and reconstructive surgery Walmsley, G. G., Maan, Z. N., Wong, V. W., Duscher, D., Hu, M. S., Zielins, E. R., Wearda, T., Muhonen, E., McArdle, A., Tevlin, R., Atashroo, D. A., Senarath-Yapa, K., Lorenz, H. P., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T. 2015; 135 (3): 907-917

    Abstract

    Over 100 million patients acquire scars in the industrialized world each year, primarily as a result of elective operations. Although undefined, the global incidence of scarring is even larger, extending to significant numbers of burn and other trauma-related wounds. Scars have the potential to exert a profound psychological and physical impact on the individual. Beyond aesthetic considerations and potential disfigurement, scarring can result in restriction of movement and reduced quality of life. The formation of a scar following skin injury is a consequence of wound healing occurring through reparative rather than regenerative mechanisms. In this article, the authors review the basic stages of wound healing; differences between adult and fetal wound healing; various mechanical, genetic, and pharmacologic strategies to reduce scarring; and the biology of skin stem/progenitor cells that may hold the key to scarless regeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000972

    View details for PubMedID 25719706

  • Exercise induces stromal cell-derived factor-1a-mediated release of endothelial progenitor cells with increased vasculogenic function. Plastic and reconstructive surgery Chang, E., Paterno, J., Duscher, D., Maan, Z. N., Chen, J. S., Januszyk, M., Rodrigues, M., Rennert, R. C., Bishop, S., Whitmore, A. J., Whittam, A. J., Longaker, M. T., Gurtner, G. C. 2015; 135 (2): 340e-50e

    Abstract

    Endothelial progenitor cells have been shown to traffic to and incorporate into ischemic tissues, where they participate in new blood vessel formation, a process termed vasculogenesis. Previous investigation has demonstrated that endothelial progenitor cells appear to mobilize from bone marrow to the peripheral circulation after exercise. In this study, the authors investigate potential etiologic factors driving this mobilization and investigate whether the mobilized endothelial progenitor cells are the same as those present at baseline.Healthy volunteers (n = 5) performed a monitored 30-minute run to maintain a heart rate greater than 140 beats/min. Venous blood samples were collected before, 10 minutes after, and 24 hours after exercise. Endothelial progenitor cells were isolated and evaluated.Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1α significantly increased nearly two-fold immediately after exercise, with a nearly four-fold increase in circulating endothelial progenitor cells 24 hours later. The endothelial progenitor cells isolated following exercise demonstrated increased colony formation, proliferation, differentiation, and secretion of angiogenic cytokines. Postexercise endothelial progenitor cells also exhibited a more robust response to hypoxic stimulation.Exercise appears to mobilize endothelial progenitor cells and augment their function by means of stromal cell-derived factor 1α-dependent signaling. The population of endothelial progenitor cells mobilized following exercise is primed for vasculogenesis with increased capacity for proliferation, differentiation, secretion of cytokines, and responsiveness to hypoxia. Given the evidence demonstrating positive regenerative effects of exercise, this may be one possible mechanism for its benefits.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000917

    View details for PubMedID 25626819

  • Cell recruitment by amnion chorion grafts promotes neovascularization JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH Maan, Z. N., Rennert, R. C., Koob, T. J., Januszyk, M., Li, W. W., Gurtner, G. C. 2015; 193 (2): 953-962

    Abstract

    Nonhealing wounds are a significant health burden. Stem and progenitor cells can accelerate wound repair and regeneration. Human amniotic membrane has demonstrated efficacy in promoting wound healing, though the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. A dehydrated human amnion chorion membrane (dHACM) was tested for its ability to recruit hematopoietic progenitor cells to a surgically implanted graft in a murine model of cutaneous ischemia.dHACM was subcutaneously implanted under elevated skin (ischemic stimulus) in either wild-type mice or mice surgically parabiosed to green fluorescent protein (GFP) + reporter mice. A control acellular dermal matrix, elevated skin without an implant, and normal unwounded skin were used as controls. Wound tissue was harvested and processed for histology and flow cytometric analysis.Implanted dHACMs recruited significantly more progenitor cells compared with controls (*P < 0.05) and displayed in vivo SDF-1 expression with incorporation of CD34 + progenitor cells within the matrix. Parabiosis modeling confirmed the circulatory origin of recruited cells, which coexpressed progenitor cell markers and were localized to foci of neovascularization within implanted matrices.In summary, dHACM effectively recruits circulating progenitor cells, likely because of stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1) expression. The recruited cells express markers of "stemness" and localize to sites of neovascularization, providing a partial mechanism for the clinical efficacy of human amniotic membrane in the treatment of chronic wounds.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jss.2014.08.045

    View details for Web of Science ID 000346244300056

    View details for PubMedID 25266600

  • Transdermal deferoxamine prevents pressure-induced diabetic ulcers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Duscher, D., Neofytou, E., Wong, V. W., Maan, Z. N., Rennert, R. C., Inayathullah, M., Januszyk, M., Rodrigues, M., Malkovskiy, A. V., Whitmore, A. J., Walmsley, G. G., Galvez, M. G., Whittam, A. J., Brownlee, M., Rajadas, J., Gurtner, G. C. 2015; 112 (1): 94-99

    Abstract

    There is a high mortality in patients with diabetes and severe pressure ulcers. For example, chronic pressure sores of the heels often lead to limb loss in diabetic patients. A major factor underlying this is reduced neovascularization caused by impaired activity of the transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). In diabetes, HIF-1α function is compromised by a high glucose-induced and reactive oxygen species-mediated modification of its coactivator p300, leading to impaired HIF-1α transactivation. We examined whether local enhancement of HIF-1α activity would improve diabetic wound healing and minimize the severity of diabetic ulcers. To improve HIF-1α activity we designed a transdermal drug delivery system (TDDS) containing the FDA-approved small molecule deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator that increases HIF-1α transactivation in diabetes by preventing iron-catalyzed reactive oxygen stress. Applying this TDDS to a pressure-induced ulcer model in diabetic mice, we found that transdermal delivery of DFO significantly improved wound healing. Unexpectedly, prophylactic application of this transdermal delivery system also prevented diabetic ulcer formation. DFO-treated wounds demonstrated increased collagen density, improved neovascularization, and reduction of free radical formation, leading to decreased cell death. These findings suggest that transdermal delivery of DFO provides a targeted means to both prevent ulcer formation and accelerate diabetic wound healing with the potential for rapid clinical translation.

    View details for DOI 10.1073/pnas.1413445112

    View details for PubMedID 25535360

  • A mouse fetal skin model of scarless wound repair. Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE Walmsley, G. G., Hu, M. S., Hong, W. X., Maan, Z. N., Lorenz, H. P., Longaker, M. T. 2015

    Abstract

    Early in utero, but not in postnatal life, cutaneous wounds undergo regeneration and heal without formation of a scar. Scarless fetal wound healing occurs across species but is age dependent. The transition from a scarless to scarring phenotype occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy in humans and around embryonic day 18 (E18) in mice. However, this varies with the size of the wound with larger defects generating a scar at an earlier gestational age. The emergence of lineage tracing and other genetic tools in the mouse has opened promising new avenues for investigation of fetal scarless wound healing. However, given the inherently high rates of morbidity and premature uterine contraction associated with fetal surgery, investigations of fetal scarless wound healing in vivo require a precise and reproducible surgical model. Here we detail a reliable model of fetal scarless wound healing in the dorsum of E16.5 (scarless) and E18.5 (scarring) mouse embryos.

    View details for DOI 10.3791/52297

    View details for PubMedID 25650841

  • Burns ITU admissions: Length of stay in specific levels of care for adult and paediatric patients BURNS Maan, Z. N., Frew, Q., Din, A. H., Unluer, Z., Smailes, S., Philp, B., El-Muttardi, N., Dziewulski, P. 2014; 40 (8): 1458-1462
  • Aging disrupts cell subpopulation dynamics and diminishes the function of mesenchymal stem cells SCIENTIFIC REPORTS Duscher, D., Rennert, R. C., Januszyk, M., Anghel, E., Maan, Z. N., Whittam, A. J., Perez, M. G., Kosaraju, R., Hu, M. S., Walmsley, G. G., Atashroo, D., Khong, S., Butte, A. J., Gurtner, G. C. 2014; 4

    Abstract

    Advanced age is associated with an increased risk of vascular morbidity, attributable in part to impairments in new blood vessel formation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to play an important role in neovascularization and deficiencies in these cells have been described in aged patients. Here we utilize single cell transcriptional analysis to determine the effect of aging on MSC population dynamics. We identify an age-related depletion of a subpopulation of MSCs characterized by a pro-vascular transcriptional profile. Supporting this finding, we demonstrate that aged MSCs are also significantly compromised in their ability to support vascular network formation in vitro and in vivo. Finally, aged MSCs are unable to rescue age-associated impairments in cutaneous wound healing. Taken together, these data suggest that age-related changes in MSC population dynamics result in impaired therapeutic potential of aged progenitor cells. These findings have critical implications for therapeutic cell source decisions (autologous versus allogeneic) and indicate the necessity of strategies to improve functionality of aged MSCs.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/srep07144

    View details for Web of Science ID 000346178900001

    View details for PubMedID 25413454

  • Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy enhances neovascularization and wound healing in diabetic mice. Plastic and reconstructive surgery Maan, Z. N., Januszyk, M., Rennert, R. C., Duscher, D., Rodrigues, M., Fujiwara, T., Ho, N., Whitmore, A., Hu, M. S., Longaker, M. T., Gurtner, G. C. 2014; 134 (3): 402e-11e

    Abstract

    Chronic wounds are a major source of morbidity for patients and represent a significant health burden. Implementing noninvasive techniques that accelerate healing of these wounds would provide great benefit. Ultrasound appears to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic wounds in humans. MIST Therapy is a noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment delivered through a saline mist. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the efficacy of ultrasound therapy, but the underlying molecular and cellular pathways impacted by this technique remain unclear. The in vivo effect of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound was therefore examined in a humanized excisional wound model.The treatment group received noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound therapy three times per week, whereas the control group received a standard dressing change. Wounds were photographed at regular intervals to calculate healing kinetics. Wound tissue was harvested and processed for histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The MIST group demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing, with 17.3 days to wound closure compared with 24 days in the controls (p < 0.05). This improvement became evident by day 9, with healing evidenced by significantly decreased mean wound area relative to original size (68 percent versus 80 percent; p < 0.01). Expression of markers of neovascularization (stromal cell-derived factor 1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and CD31) was also increased in the wound beds of noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound-treated mice compared with controls.Noncontact, low-frequency ultrasound treatment improves neovascularization and wound closure rates in excisional wounds for diabetic mice, likely because of the stimulated release of angiogenic factors.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/PRS.0000000000000467

    View details for PubMedID 25158717

  • Diabetes irreversibly depletes bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cell subpopulations. Diabetes Januszyk, M., Sorkin, M., Glotzbach, J. P., Vial, I. N., Maan, Z. N., Rennert, R. C., Duscher, D., Thangarajah, H., Longaker, M. T., Butte, A. J., Gurtner, G. C. 2014; 63 (9): 3047-3056

    Abstract

    Diabetic vascular pathology is largely attributable to impairments in tissue recovery from hypoxia. Circulating progenitor cells have been postulated to play a role in ischemic recovery and deficiencies in these cells have been well described in diabetic patients. Here, we examine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (BM-MPCs) that have previously been shown to be important for new blood vessel formation, and demonstrate significant deficits in the context of diabetes. Further, we determine that this dysfunction is attributable to intrinsic defects in diabetic BM-MPCs that are not correctable by restoring glucose homeostasis. We identify two transcriptionally distinct subpopulations that are selectively depleted by both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and these subpopulations have pro-vasculogenic expression profiles, suggesting that they are vascular progenitor cells. These results suggest that the clinically observed deficits in progenitor cells may be attributable to selective and irreversible depletion of progenitor cell subsets in patients with diabetes.

    View details for DOI 10.2337/db13-1366

    View details for PubMedID 24740572

  • Gene expression in fetal murine keratinocytes and fibroblasts JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH Hu, M. S., Januszyk, M., Hong, W. X., Walmsley, G. G., Zielins, E. R., Atashroo, D. A., Maan, Z. N., McArdle, A., Takanishi, D. M., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T., Lorenz, H. P. 2014; 190 (1): 344-357

    Abstract

    Early fetuses heal wounds without the formation of a scar. Many studies have attempted to explain this remarkable phenomenon. However, the exact mechanism remains unknown. Herein, we examine the predominant cell types of the epidermis and dermis-the keratinocyte and fibroblast-during different stages of fetal development to better understand the changes that lead to scarring wound repair versus regeneration.Keratinocytes and fibroblasts were harvested and cultured from the dorsal skin of time-dated BALB/c fetuses. Total RNA was isolated and microarray analysis was performed using chips with 42,000 genes. Significance analysis of microarrays was used to select genes with >2-fold expression differences with a false discovery rate <2. Enrichment analysis was performed on significant genes to identify differentially expressed pathways.By comparing the gene expression profile of keratinocytes from E16 versus E18 fetuses, we identified 24 genes that were downregulated at E16. Analysis of E16 and E18 fibroblasts revealed 522 differentially expressed genes. Enrichment analysis showed the top 20 signaling pathways that were downregulated in E16 keratinocytes and upregulated or downregulated in E16 fibroblasts.Our data reveal 546 differentially expressed genes in keratinocytes and fibroblasts between the scarless and scarring transition. In addition, a total of 60 signaling pathways have been identified to be either upregulated or downregulated in these cell types. The genes and pathways recognized by our study may prove to be essential targets that may discriminate between fetal wound regeneration and adult wound repair.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jss.2014.02.030

    View details for Web of Science ID 000338444700051

    View details for PubMedID 24726057

  • Tissue engineering and regenerative repair in wound healing. Annals of biomedical engineering Hu, M. S., Maan, Z. N., Wu, J., Rennert, R. C., Hong, W. X., Lai, T. S., Cheung, A. T., Walmsley, G. G., Chung, M. T., McArdle, A., Longaker, M. T., Lorenz, H. P. 2014; 42 (7): 1494-1507

    Abstract

    Wound healing is a highly evolved defense mechanism against infection and further injury. It is a complex process involving multiple cell types and biological pathways. Mammalian adult cutaneous wound healing is mediated by a fibroproliferative response leading to scar formation. In contrast, early to mid-gestational fetal cutaneous wound healing is more akin to regeneration and occurs without scar formation. This early observation has led to extensive research seeking to unlock the mechanism underlying fetal scarless regenerative repair. Building upon recent advances in biomaterials and stem cell applications, tissue engineering approaches are working towards a recapitulation of this phenomenon. In this review, we describe the elements that distinguish fetal scarless and adult scarring wound healing, and discuss current trends in tissue engineering aimed at achieving scarless tissue regeneration.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s10439-014-1010-z

    View details for PubMedID 24788648

  • Mechanotransduction and fibrosis JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS Duscher, D., Maan, Z. N., Wong, V. W., Rennert, R. C., Januszyk, M., Rodrigues, M., Hu, M., Whitmore, A. J., Whittam, A. J., Longaker, M. T., Gurtner, G. C. 2014; 47 (9): 1997-2005

    Abstract

    Scarring and tissue fibrosis represent a significant source of morbidity in the United States. Despite considerable research focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying cutaneous scar formation, effective clinical therapies are still in the early stages of development. A thorough understanding of the various signaling pathways involved is essential to formulate strategies to combat fibrosis and scarring. While initial efforts focused primarily on the biochemical mechanisms involved in scar formation, more recent research has revealed a central role for mechanical forces in modulating these pathways. Mechanotransduction, which refers to the mechanisms by which mechanical forces are converted to biochemical stimuli, has been closely linked to inflammation and fibrosis and is believed to play a critical role in scarring. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying scar formation, with an emphasis on the relationship between mechanotransduction pathways and their therapeutic implications.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2014.03.031

    View details for Web of Science ID 000338621900009

  • Diabetes impairs the angiogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cells by selectively depleting cellular subpopulations STEM CELL RESEARCH & THERAPY Rennert, R. C., Sorkin, M., Januszyk, M., Duscher, D., Kosaraju, R., Chung, M. T., Lennon, J., Radiya-Dixit, A., Raghvendra, S., Maan, Z. N., Hu, M. S., Rajadas, J., Rodrigues, M., Gurtner, G. C. 2014; 5

    View details for DOI 10.1186/scrt468

    View details for Web of Science ID 000338465500001

  • Epidermal or dermal specific knockout of PHD-2 enhances wound healing and minimizes ischemic injury. PloS one Zimmermann, A. S., Morrison, S. D., Hu, M. S., Li, S., Nauta, A., Sorkin, M., Meyer, N. P., Walmsley, G. G., Maan, Z. N., Chan, D. A., Gurtner, G. C., Giaccia, A. J., Longaker, M. T. 2014; 9 (4)

    Abstract

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, part of the heterodimeric transcription factor that mediates the cellular response to hypoxia, is critical for the expression of multiple angiogenic growth factors, cell motility, and the recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells. Inhibition of the oxygen-dependent negative regulator of HIF-1α, prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD-2), leads to increased HIF-1α and mimics various cellular and physiological responses to hypoxia. The roles of PHD-2 in the epidermis and dermis have not been clearly defined in wound healing.Epidermal and dermal specific PHD-2 knockout (KO) mice were developed in a C57BL/6J (wild type) background by crossing homozygous floxed PHD-2 mice with heterozygous K14-Cre mice and heterozygous Col1A2-Cre-ER mice to get homozygous floxed PHD-2/heterozygous K14-Cre and homozygous floxed PHD-2/heterozygous floxed Col1A2-Cre-ER mice, respectively. Ten to twelve-week-old PHD-2 KO and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to wounding and ischemic pedicle flap model. The amount of healing was grossly quantified with ImageJ software. Western blot and qRT-PCR was run on protein and RNA from primary cells cultured in vitro.qRT-PCR demonstrated a significant decrease of PHD-2 in keratinocytes and fibroblasts derived from tissue specific KO mice relative to control mice (*p<0.05). Western blot analysis showed a significant increase in HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels in PHD-2 KO mice relative to control mice (*p<0.05). PHD-2 KO mice showed significantly accelerated wound closure relative to WT (*p<0.05). When ischemia was analyzed at day nine post-surgery in a flap model, the PHD-2 tissue specific knockout mice showed significantly more viable flaps than WT (*p<0.05).PHD-2 plays a significant role in the rates of wound healing and response to ischemic insult in mice. Further exploration shows PHD-2 KO increases cellular levels of HIF-1α and this increase leads to the transcription of downstream angiogenic factors such as VEGF.

    View details for DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0093373

    View details for PubMedID 24695462

  • Wound healing: an update REGENERATIVE MEDICINE Zielins, E. R., Atashroo, D. A., Maan, Z. N., Duscher, D., Walmsley, G. G., Marecic, O., Hu, M., Senarath-Yapa, K., McArdle, A., Tevlin, R., Wearda, T., Paik, K. J., Duldulao, C., Hong, W. X., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T. 2014; 9 (6): 817-830

    View details for DOI 10.2217/RME.14.54

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345620600012

  • Biological therapies for the treatment of cutaneous wounds: Phase III and launched therapies EXPERT OPINION ON BIOLOGICAL THERAPY Rennert, R. C., Rodrigues, M., Wong, V. W., Duscher, D., Hu, M., Maan, Z., Sorkin, M., Gurtner, G. C., Longaker, M. T. 2013; 13 (11): 1523-1541

    Abstract

    Normal wound healing mechanisms can be overwhelmed in the setting of complex acute and chronic tissue injury. Biological therapies are designed to augment and/or restore the body's natural wound healing abilities. There are a variety of available and emerging technologies utilizing this approach that have demonstrated the ability to augment wound healing.In this review, the clinical data on launched and emerging biological therapies for wound healing applications are summarized. The methodologies discussed include biological skin equivalents, growth factors/small molecules and stem cell-based therapies.While many products possess convincing clinical data demonstrating their efficacy in comparison to standard treatment options, more robust, controlled studies are needed to determine the relative value among established and emerging biological therapies. Future bioengineering and stem cell-based approaches are of particular interest due to the simultaneous correction of multiple deficiencies present in the nonhealing wound.

    View details for DOI 10.1517/14712598.2013.842972

    View details for Web of Science ID 000325712100007

    View details for PubMedID 24093722

  • The influence of key clinical practices on the knowledge of first year doctors about the patients under their care INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PRACTICE Naqvi, M., Ward, S. T., Dowswell, G., Donnelly, J. 2013; 67 (2): 181-188

    Abstract

    In 2009 in the United Kingdom the 48-h working week was introduced for junior doctors. To comply with this traditional working practices have changed. This study aims to assess how much first year (FY1) doctors know about the acute surgical patients they manage and how this is influenced by changes in key working practices.Surgical FY1s working in NHS hospitals answered 16 clinical questions about a standard acute surgical patient under their care 48 h after admission. Scores were analysed according to how long the FY1 had been looking after the patient, whether they had clerked the patient in, attended the post take ward round (PTWR), used a handover sheet to answer the questions and had sole or shared responsibility for the patient.Two hundred and seventy-four FY1s (92% response rate) from 36 hospitals were surveyed. The overall median score was 11/16 (inter-quartile range 8-13). Only 8.4% (23/274) FY1s had clerked in the patient and 58.4% (160/274) had attended the PTWR. Clerking patients and attending the PTWR resulted in significantly higher test scores compared to FY1s who did not perform these activities (p = < 0.001 and 0.001 respectively). The scores of the 67.2% who used a handover sheet were significantly lower than those who did not (p = 0.001). Having sole or shared responsibility and duration of care made no significant difference (p = 0.143 and p = 0.458 respectively)The results demonstrate that junior doctors' knowledge of their patients is significantly enhanced when they have the opportunity to perform the admission clerking and attend the PTWR. Because of working hours' restrictions this is now rare. Although use of handover sheets appears to ensure that certain key facts immediately related to the current admission are passed on, it is associated with significantly poorer wider knowledge of the patient.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/ijcp.12082

    View details for Web of Science ID 000313688400012

    View details for PubMedID 23216806

  • Systematic review of predictors of surgical performance BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY Maan, Z. N., Maan, I. N., Darzi, A. W., Aggarwal, R. 2012; 99 (12): 1610-1621

    Abstract

    Selection criteria for surgical training are not scientifically proven. There is a need to define which attributes predict future surgical performance. The aim of this study was to examine the predictive value of specific attributes that impact on surgical performance.All studies assessing the predictive power of specified attributes with regard to outcome measures of surgical performance in MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Educational Resources Information Centre databases, and bibliographies of selected articles from 1950 to November 2010 were considered for inclusion by two independent reviewers. Information on study identifiers, participant characteristics, predictors assessed, evaluation methods for predictors, outcome measures, results and statistical analysis was collected. Quality assessment was carried out using the Hayden criteria.Visual-spatial perception correlated with both subjective and objective assessments of surgical performance, including rate of skill acquisition. Visual-spatial perception did not correlate with operative ability in experts, although it did with operative ability at the end of a training programme. Psychomotor aptitude, assessed collectively, correlated with rate of skill acquisition. Academic achievement predicted completion of a training programme and passing end-of-training examinations, but did not predict clinical performance during the training programme.Intermediate- and high-level visual-spatial perception, as well as psychomotor aptitude, can be used as criteria for assessing candidates for surgical training. Academic achievement is an effective predictor of successful completion of training programmes and should continue to form part of the assessment of surgical candidates.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/bjs.8893

    View details for Web of Science ID 000310727300002

    View details for PubMedID 23034658

  • Co-existing neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve and an arterio-venous malformation after open carpal tunnel decompression JOURNAL OF PLASTIC RECONSTRUCTIVE AND AESTHETIC SURGERY Sierakowski, A., Tare, M., Maan, Z. 2012; 65 (4): 541-542

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.bjps.2011.09.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000301982000039

    View details for PubMedID 21968282

  • The use of robotics in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery: a systematic review AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY Maan, Z. N., Gibbins, N., Al-Jabri, T., D'Souza, A. R. 2012; 33 (1): 137-146

    Abstract

    Robotic surgery has become increasingly used due to its enhancement of visualization, precision, and articulation. It eliminates many of the problems encountered with conventional minimally invasive techniques and has been shown to result in reduced blood loss and complications. The rise in endoscopic procedures in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, and associated difficulties, suggests that robotic surgery may have a role to play.To determine whether robotic surgery conveys any benefits compared to conventional minimally invasive approaches, specifically looking at precision, operative time, and visualization.A systematic review of the literature with a defined search strategy.Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL using strategy: ((robot* OR (robot*AND surgery)) AND (ent OR otolaryngology)) to November 2010.Articles reviewed by authors and data compiled in tables for analysis.There were 33 references included in the study. Access and visualization were regularly mentioned as key benefits, though no objective data has been recorded in any study. Once initial setup difficulties were overcome, operative time was shown to decrease with robotic surgery, except in one controlled series of thyroid surgeries. Precision was also highlighted as an advantage, particularly in otological and skull base surgery. Postoperative outcomes were considered equivalent to or better than conventional surgery. Cost was the biggest drawback.The evidence base to date suggests there are benefits to robotic surgery in OHNS, particularly with regards to access, precision, and operative time but there is a lack of controlled, prospective studies with objective outcome measures. In addition, economic feasibility studies must be carried out before a robotic OHNS service is established.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.amjoto.2011.04.003

    View details for Web of Science ID 000298070800025

    View details for PubMedID 21658808

  • Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema associated with mephedrone usage. Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England Maan, Z. N., D'Souza, A. R. 2012; 94 (1): e38-40

    Abstract

    Subcutaneous emphysema in the head and neck is a rare condition, normally caused by major underlying injury to the airway or gastrointestinal tract. We report a non-traumatic occurrence of spontaneous cervical subcutaneous emphysema in a 30-year-old man who had been snorting mephedrone. The patient made an uneventful recovery, being managed conservatively, and did not require airway support. The occurrence of spontaneous cervical emphysema associated with snorting mephedrone has not been previously described in the literature.

    View details for DOI 10.1308/003588412X13171221499108

    View details for PubMedID 22524925

  • Ultrasonography of simple intratesticular cysts: a 13 year experience in a single centre DIAGNOSTIC PATHOLOGY Al-Jabri, T., Misra, S., Maan, Z. N., Khan, K., Coker, C., Thompson, P. 2011; 6

    Abstract

    Simple intratesticular cysts are being reported more commonly due to the wider use of scrotal ultrasonography however, their management remains unclear. Treatment has included enucleation, radical orchidectomy (over fear of an associated malignancy) and a more conservative approach with serial ultrasonography (if a neoplastic cyst is clearly ruled out). In view of the benign nature of such cysts, even serial ultrasonography may be unnecessary. We evaluate the presentation, diagnosis and management of ultrasound-detected simple intratesticular cysts over a 13-year period.Between May 1994 and August 2007, 24 men were found to have simple intratesticular cysts on scrotal ultrasonography. Records were analysed retrospectively to identify the clinicoradiologic findings and the management.Median follow up was 29.5 months (range 4 - 108 months). Only one patient became symptomatic with a cyst which increased in size by 13 mm over 15 months. Orchidectomy performed at the patient's request confirmed a benign simple cyst.In our series, a significant change in size of the cyst with accompanying symptoms was observed in one case only. Asymptomatic patients with simple intratesticular cysts without associated features of bias towards malignancy can be discharged without need for further follow-up.

    View details for DOI 10.1186/1746-1596-6-24

    View details for Web of Science ID 000289078600001

    View details for PubMedID 21435258

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