Clinical Focus

  • Pediatric Hospital Medicine
  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments

  • Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

Administrative Appointments

  • Associate Chair, Education, Residency Programs, Department of Pediatrics (2014 - Present)
  • Fellowship Co-Director, Pediatric Hospital Medicine Fellowship (2013 - Present)
  • Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program (2012 - Present)
  • Program Director, Combined Pediatrics and Anesthesia Residency Programs (2012 - Present)
  • Associate Program Director, Advising and Career Development, Pediatric Residency Program (2007 - 2012)

Honors & Awards

  • Caroline Graham Lamberts Gratitude and Service Award, Stanford Pediatrics Residency Program (2014)
  • Award of Excellence, Advising Junior Faculty, Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (2013)
  • Ray E. Helfer Award for Innovation in Medical Education, Academic Pediatric Association (2012)
  • Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Stanford University School of Medicine (2010)
  • Ted Sectish Award for Advocating for Residents, Stanford Pediatrics Residency Program (2008, 2010, 2013)
  • Pediatric Academic Society Educational Scholar, Academic Pediatric Association (2006-2010)
  • Faculty Teaching Honor Roll with Letter of Teaching Distinction, Stanford University School of Medicine (2007-2014)
  • Arthur L Bloomberg Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Stanford University School of Medicine (2008)

Professional Education

  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2005)
  • Residency:Univ of California San Francisco (2004) CA
  • Internship:Univ of California San Francisco (2002) CA
  • Chief Residency, UCSF, Pediatrics (2005)
  • Medical Education:University of Chicago (2001) IL
  • MPH, UC, Berkeley, Maternal and Child Health (2000)
  • BS, Caltech, Biology (1996)

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests

I am interested in graduate medical education -- particularly in understanding how learners learn best and how to optimize graduate medical education given recent work hours changes, increasing handoffs, increasing patient safety standards which have led to increased supervision, and limited longitudinal exposure with faculty.

A few of my studies/areas of interest include:
(1) National Nighttime Curriculum Study: Measured the impact of a national nighttime curriculum on residents' perception of learning, confidence and knowledge in handling routine overnight issues.
(2) Coaching Initiative: An innovative approach to provide longitudinal assessment and feedback to residents, and help residents develop skills of lifelong learning and self-reflection. This program pairs a faculty coach with ten residents, who they follow for all three years.
(3) Scholarly Concentrations: Studying the impact of scholarly concentrations on resident learners.
(4) IPASS Study (National Handoff Study; we were one of nine pilot sites): Implemented an educational intervention to improve residents' knowledge and use of handoff tools.
(5) Remediation: Creating better tools for identifying and helping remediating learners.
(6) Residents as Teachers: Measuring the impact of our required senior resident rotation in teaching.


All Publications

  • Outcomes of a Randomized Controlled Educational Intervention to Train Pediatric Residents on Caring for Children With Special Health Care Needs CLINICAL PEDIATRICS Bogetz, J. F., Gabhart, J. M., Rassbach, C. E., Sanders, L. M., Mendoza, F. S., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L. 2015; 54 (7): 659-666


    Objective. To evaluate an innovative curriculum meeting new pediatric residency education guidelines, Special Care Optimization for Patients and Education (SCOPE). Methods. Residents were randomized to intervention (n = 23) or control (n = 25) groups. Intervention residents participated in SCOPE, pairing them with a child with special health care needs (CSHCN) and faculty mentor to make a home visit, complete care coordination toolkits, and participate in case discussions. The primary outcome was resident self-efficacy in nine skills in caring for CSHCN. Secondary outcomes included curriculum feasibility/acceptance, resident attitudes, and family satisfaction. Results. Response rates were ≥65%. Intervention residents improved in their self-efficacy for setting patient-centered goals compared with controls (mean change on 4-point Likert-type scale, 1.36 vs 0.56, P < .05). SCOPE was feasible/acceptable, residents had improved attitudes toward CSHCN, and families reported high satisfaction. Conclusion. SCOPE may serve as a model for efforts to increase residents' self-efficacy in their care of patients with chronic disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564050

    View details for Web of Science ID 000354656600008

    View details for PubMedID 25561698

  • Questioning as a teaching tool. Pediatrics Long, M., Blankenburg, R., Butani, L. 2015; 135 (3): 406-408


    The Dreyfus and Bloom frameworks can help the great clinical teacher craft questions that are learner-centric and appropriately challenging.Employing strategies to ask the right questions in the right way can further add to the effectiveness of using questions as a valuable teaching,learning, and assessment tool.

    View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2014-3285

    View details for PubMedID 25647682

  • Continuing education needs of pediatricians across diverse specialties caring for children with medical complexity. Clinical pediatrics Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Gabhart, J. M., Bergman, D. A., Blankenburg, R. L., Rassbach, C. E. 2015; 54 (3): 222-227


    Objective. Care for children with medical complexity (CMC) relies on pediatricians who often are ill equipped, but striving to provide high quality care. We performed a needs assessment of pediatricians across diverse subspecialties at a tertiary academic US children's hospital about their continuing education needs regarding the care of CMC. Methods. Eighteen pediatricians from diverse subspecialties were asked to complete an online anonymous open-ended survey. Data were analyzed using modified grounded theory. Results. The response rate was 89% (n = 16). Of participants, 31.2% (n = 5) were general pediatricians, 18.7% (n = 3) were hospitalists, and 50% (n = 8) were pediatric subspecialists. Pediatricians recognized the need for skills in care coordination, giving bad news, working in interprofessional teams, and setting goals of care with patients. Conclusions. Practicing pediatricians need skills to improve care for CMC. Strategically incorporating basic palliative care education may fill an important training need across diverse pediatric specialties.

    View details for DOI 10.1177/0009922814564049

    View details for PubMedID 25561699

  • Changes in Medical Errors after Implementation of a Handoff Program NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE Starmer, A. J., Spector, N. D., Srivastava, R., West, D. C., Rosenbluth, G., Allen, A. D., NOBLE, E. L., Tse, L. L., Dalal, A. K., Keohane, C. A., Lipsitz, S. R., Rothschild, J. M., Wien, M. F., Yoon, C. S., Zigmont, K. R., Wilson, K. M., O'Toole, J. K., Solan, L. G., Aylor, M., Bismilla, Z., Coffey, M., Mahant, S., Blankenburg, R. L., Destino, L. A., EVERHART, J. L., Patel, S. J., Bale, J. F., Spackman, J. B., Stevenson, A. T., Calaman, S., Cole, F. S., Balmer, D. F., Hepps, J. H., Lopreiato, J. O., Yu, C. E., Sectish, T. C., Landrigan, C. P. 2014; 371 (19): 1803-1812
  • The Prevalence of Social and Behavioral Topics and Related Educational Opportunities During Attending Rounds ACADEMIC MEDICINE Satterfield, J. M., Bereknyei, S., Hilton, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Blankenburg, R., Buckelew, S. M., Chen, H. C., Monash, B., Ramos, J. S., Rennke, S., Braddock, C. H. 2014; 89 (11): 1548-1557
  • Challenges and Potential Solutions to Educating Learners About Pediatric Complex Care ACADEMIC PEDIATRICS Bogetz, J. F., Bogetz, A. L., Bergman, D., Turner, T., Blankenburg, R., Ballantine, A. 2014; 14 (6): 603-609
  • Stimulating Reflective Practice Among Your Learners PEDIATRICS Butani, L., Blankenburg, R., Long, M. 2013; 131 (2): 204-206

    View details for DOI 10.1542/peds.2012-3106

    View details for Web of Science ID 000314355100044

    View details for PubMedID 23339227

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