Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatrics

Academic Appointments


Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Pediatric Infectious Disease, American Board of Pediatrics (2013)
  • Board Certification: Pediatrics, American Board of Pediatrics (2009)
  • Residency:University of Washington Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center (2009) WA
  • Fellowship:Stanford University - Infectious Diseases (2013) CA
  • Internship:University of Washington Childrens Hospital and Regional Medical Center (2009) WA
  • Medical Education:Univ of California San Francisco (2006) CA

Publications

All Publications


  • Immunodeficiency-related vaccine-derived poliovirus (iVDPV) cases: A systematic review and implications for polio eradication VACCINE Guo, J., Bolivar-Wagers, S., Srinivas, N., Holubar, M., Maldonado, Y. 2015; 33 (10): 1235-1242

    Abstract

    Vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs), strains of poliovirus mutated from the oral polio vaccine, pose a challenge to global polio eradication. Immunodeficiency-related vaccine-derived polioviruses (iVDPVs) are a type of VDPV which may serve as sources of poliovirus reintroduction after the eradication of wild-type poliovirus. This review is a comprehensive update of confirmed iVDPV cases published in the scientific literature from 1962 to 2012, and describes clinically relevant trends in reported iVDPV cases worldwide.We conducted a systematic review of published iVDPV case reports from January 1960 to November 2012 from four databases. We included cases in which the patient had a primary immunodeficiency, and the vaccine virus isolated from the patient either met the sequencing definition of VDPV (>1% divergence for serotypes 1 and 3 and >0.6% for serotype 2) and/or was previously reported as an iVDPV by the World Health Organization.We identified 68 iVDPV cases in 49 manuscripts reported from 25 countries and the Palestinian territories. 62% of case patients were male, 78% presented clinically with acute flaccid paralysis, and 65% were iVDPV2. 57% of cases occurred in patients with predominantly antibody immunodeficiencies, and the overall all-cause mortality rate was greater than 60%. The median age at case detection was 1.4 years [IQR: 0.8, 4.5] and the median duration of shedding was 1.3 years [IQR: 0.7, 2.2]. We identified a poliovirus genome VP1 region mutation rate of 0.72% per year and a higher median percent divergence for iVDPV1 cases. More cases were reported from high income countries, which also had a larger age variation and different distribution of immunodeficiencies compared to upper and lower middle-income countries.Our study describes the incidence and characteristics of global iVDPV cases reported in the literature in the past five decades. It also highlights the regional and economic disparities of reported iVDPV cases.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.018

    View details for Web of Science ID 000350083600004

  • Evaluation of Serial Urine Viral Cultures for the Diagnosis of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Neonates and Infants PEDIATRIC AND DEVELOPMENTAL PATHOLOGY Chisholm, K. M., Aziz, N., McDowell, M., Guo, F. P., Srinivas, N., Benitz, W. E., Norton, M. E., Gutierrez, K., Folkins, A. K., Pinsky, B. A. 2014; 17 (3): 176-180

    Abstract

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common cause of congenital infection worldwide. Urine viral culture is the standard for CMV diagnosis in neonates and infants. The objectives of this study were to compare the performance of serial paired rapid shell vial cultures (SVC) and routine viral cultures (RVC), and to determine the optimal number of cultures needed to detect positive cases. From 2001 to 2011, all paired CMV SVC and RVC performed on neonates and infants less than 100 days of age were recorded. Testing episodes were defined as sets of cultures performed within 7 days of one another. A total of 1264 neonates and infants underwent 1478 testing episodes; 68 (5.4%) had at least one episode with a positive CMV culture. In episodes where CMV was detected before day 21 of life, the first specimen was positive in 100% (16/16) of cases. When testing occurred after 21 days of life, the first specimen was positive in 82.7% (43/52) of cases, requiring three cultures to reach 100% detection. The SVC was more prone to assay failure than RVC. Overall, when RVC was compared to SVC, there was 86.0% positive agreement and 99.9% negative agreement. In conclusion, three serial urine samples are necessary for detection of CMV in specimens collected between day of life 22 and 99, while one sample may be sufficient on or before day of life 21. Though SVC was more sensitive than RVC, the risk of SVC failure supports the use of multimodality testing to optimize detection.

    View details for DOI 10.2350/14-01-1432-OA.1

    View details for Web of Science ID 000341451500004

  • A PEDIATRIC CASE OF NEW DELHI METALLO-beta-LACTAMASE-1-PRODUCING ENTEROBACTERIACEAE IN THE UNITED STATES PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL Green, D. A., Srinivas, N., Watz, N., Tenover, F. C., Amieva, M., Banaei, N. 2013; 32 (11): 1291-1294

    Abstract

    We report the second pediatric case of New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM-1)-producing Enterobacteriaceae in the United States in a girl from India who presented to a teaching hospital in Northern California with cystitis due to NDM-1-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Laboratory methods included various phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing assays, as well as PCR assays for carbapenemase-encoding genes. Laboratory challenges included a false negative modified Hodge test and reversion of carbapenem resistance in the E. coli strain. The limited number of effective antimicrobial agents and the lack of pediatric-specific safety and efficacy data for these drugs presented significant therapeutic challenges.

    View details for DOI 10.1097/INF.0b013e31829eca34

    View details for Web of Science ID 000330832500030