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  • Etiology of impaired selective motor control: emerging evidence and its implications for research and treatment in cerebral palsy DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE AND CHILD NEUROLOGY Cahill-Rowley, K., Rose, J. 2014; 56 (6): 522-528

    Abstract

    Selective motor control (SMC) impairment involves movement patterns dominated by flexor or extensor synergies that interfere with functional movements in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Emerging evidence on neural correlates of impaired SMC has important implications for etiology and for the treatment for children with CP. Early evidence on the microstructure of brain white matter assessed with diffusion tensor imaging in adult patients after stroke suggests that the rubrospinal tract may compensate for injury to the corticospinal tract. Furthermore, the observed changes on diffusion tensor imaging corresponded to the degree of SMC impairment. The rubrospinal tract may provide imperfect compensation in response to corticospinal tract injury, resulting in diminished SMC. Cortical mapping evidence in stroke patients indicates that loss of SMC is also associated with increased overlap of joint representation in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of SMC impairment can be assessed with the recently developed Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity, a validated observation-based measure designed for children with spastic CP. Recent advances in neuroimaging and assessment of SMC provide an opportunity to better understand the etiology and impact of impaired SMC, which may ultimately guide strategic treatment for children with CP.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/dmcn.12355

    View details for Web of Science ID 000335507500009

  • Functional Task Kinematics of the Thumb Carpometacarpal Joint CLINICAL ORTHOPAEDICS AND RELATED RESEARCH Luker, K. R., Aguinaldo, A., Kenney, D., Cahill-Rowley, K., Ladd, A. L. 2014; 472 (4): 1123-1129

    Abstract

    Abnormal biomechanical loading has been identified as an associated risk factor of osteoarthritis in the wrist and hand. Empirical data to date are insufficient to describe the role of altered biomechanics in thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthritis.This is a pilot study to evaluate motion analysis of the upper extremity while performing functional tasks. We wished to describe the in vivo kinematics of the thumb and hand in relation to the larger joints of the upper extremity in subjects without arthritis in functional positions at rest and while loading the CMC joint. If reproducible, we then planned to compare kinematics between these subjects and a subject with advanced thumb CMC arthritis.In vivo kinematics of the hand and upper extremity during the functional tasks of grasp, jar opening, and pinch with and without loading of the CMC joint were evaluated using cameras and a motion-capture system in four asymptomatic female subjects and one female subject with advanced radiographic (Eaton Stage IV) osteoarthritis.Kinematics of the hand and upper extremity can be reliably quantified. Loading of the CMC joint did not alter the hand and forearm kinematics in control subjects. In the subject with osteoarthritis, the adduction-extension deformity at the CMC joint resulted in kinematic alterations as compared with the four control subjects.This study represents preliminary steps in defining thumb CMC position, motion, and loading associated with activities of daily living. These findings enhance our understanding of motion at the CMC joint and how it differs in arthritic patients.Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

    View details for DOI 10.1007/s11999-013-2964-0

    View details for Web of Science ID 000332576400013

  • Brain microstructural development at near-term age in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants: An atlas-based diffusion imaging study NEUROIMAGE Rose, J., Vassar, R., Cahill-Rowley, K., Guzman, X. S., Stevenson, D. K., Barnea-Goraly, N. 2014; 86: 244-256

    Abstract

    At near-term age the brain undergoes rapid growth and development. Abnormalities identified during this period have been recognized as potential predictors of neurodevelopment in children born preterm. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter (WM) microstructure in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants to better understand regional WM developmental trajectories at near-term age. DTI scans were analyzed in a cross-sectional sample of 45 VLBW preterm infants (BW≤1500g, GA≤32weeks) within a cohort of 102 neonates admitted to the NICU and recruited to participate prior to standard-of-care MRI, from 2010 to 2011, 66/102 also had DTI. For inclusion in this analysis, 45 infants had DTI, no evidence of brain abnormality on MRI, and were scanned at PMA ≤40weeks (34.7-38.6). White matter microstructure was analyzed in 19 subcortical regions defined by DiffeoMap neonatal brain atlas, using threshold values of trace <0.006mm(2)s(-1) and FA >0.15. Regional fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were calculated and temporal-spatial trajectories of development were examined in relation to PMA and brain region location. Posterior regions within the corona radiata (CR), corpus callosum (CC), and internal capsule (IC) demonstrated significantly higher mean FA values compared to anterior regions. Posterior regions of the CR and IC demonstrated significantly lower RD values compared to anterior regions. Centrally located projection fibers demonstrated higher mean FA and lower RD values than peripheral regions including the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle, retrolenticular part of the IC, posterior thalamic radiation, and sagittal stratum. Centrally located association fibers of the external capsule had higher FA and lower RD than the more peripherally-located superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). A significant relationship between PMA-at-scan and FA, MD, and RD was demonstrated by a majority of regions, the strongest correlations were observed in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, a region undergoing early stages of myelination at near-term age, in which FA increased (r=.433, p=.003) and MD (r=-.545, p=.000) and RD (r=-.540, p=.000) decreased with PMA-at-scan. No correlation with PMA-at-scan was observed in the CC or SLF, regions that myelinate later in infancy. Regional patterns of higher FA and lower RD were observed at this near-term age, suggestive of more advanced microstructural development in posterior compared to anterior regions within the CR, CC, and IC and in central compared to peripheral WM structures. Evidence of region-specific rates of microstructural development was observed. Temporal-spatial patterns of WM microstructure development at near-term age have important implications for interpretation of near-term DTI and for identification of aberrations in typical developmental trajectories that may signal future impairment.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage2013.09.053

    View details for Web of Science ID 000330335300026

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