Bio

Professional Education


  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin Madison (2011)

Stanford Advisors


Publications

All Publications


  • Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions CELL Grubert, F., Zaugg, J. B., Kasowski, M., Ursu, O., Spacek, D. V., Martin, A. R., Greenside, P., Srivas, R., Phanstiel, D. H., Pekowska, A., Heidari, N., Euskirchen, G., Huber, W., Pritchard, J. K., Bustamante, C. D., Steinmetz, L. M., Kundaje, A., Snyder, M. 2015; 162 (5): 1051-1065
  • Genetic Control of Chromatin States in Humans Involves Local and Distal Chromosomal Interactions. Cell Grubert, F., Zaugg, J. B., Kasowski, M., Ursu, O., Spacek, D. V., Martin, A. R., Greenside, P., Srivas, R., Phanstiel, D. H., Pekowska, A., Heidari, N., Euskirchen, G., Huber, W., Pritchard, J. K., Bustamante, C. D., Steinmetz, L. M., Kundaje, A., Snyder, M. 2015; 162 (5): 1051-1065

    Abstract

    Deciphering the impact of genetic variants on gene regulation is fundamental to understanding human disease. Although gene regulation often involves long-range interactions, it is unknown to what extent non-coding genetic variants influence distal molecular phenotypes. Here, we integrate chromatin profiling for three histone marks in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 75 sequenced individuals with LCL-specific Hi-C and ChIA-PET-based chromatin contact maps to uncover one of the largest collections of local and distal histone quantitative trait loci (hQTLs). Distal QTLs are enriched within topologically associated domains and exhibit largely concordant variation of chromatin state coordinated by proximal and distal non-coding genetic variants. Histone QTLs are enriched for common variants associated with autoimmune diseases and enable identification of putative target genes of disease-associated variants from genome-wide association studies. These analyses provide insights into how genetic variation can affect human disease phenotypes by coordinated changes in chromatin at interacting regulatory elements.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2015.07.048

    View details for PubMedID 26300125

  • Genome-wide map of regulatory interactions in the human genome GENOME RESEARCH Heidari, N., Phanstiel, D. H., He, C., Grubert, F., Jahanbani, F., Kasowski, M., Zhang, M. Q., Snyder, M. P. 2014; 24 (12): 1905-1917

    Abstract

    Increasing evidence suggests that interactions between regulatory genomic elements play an important role in regulating gene expression. We generated a genome-wide interaction map of regulatory elements in human cells (ENCODE tier 1 cells, K562, GM12878) using Chromatin Interaction Analysis by Paired-End Tag sequencing (ChIA-PET) experiments targeting six broadly distributed factors. Bound regions covered 80% of DNase I hypersensitive sites including 99.7% of TSS and 98% of enhancers. Correlating this map with ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data sets revealed cohesin, CTCF, and ZNF143 as key components of three-dimensional chromatin structure and revealed how the distal chromatin state affects gene transcription. Comparison of interactions between cell types revealed that enhancer-promoter interactions were highly cell-type-specific. Construction and comparison of distal and proximal regulatory networks revealed stark differences in structure and biological function. Proximal binding events are enriched at genes with housekeeping functions, while distal binding events interact with genes involved in dynamic biological processes including response to stimulus. This study reveals new mechanistic and functional insights into regulatory region organization in the nucleus.

    View details for DOI 10.1101/gr.176586.114

    View details for Web of Science ID 000345810600001

  • Sushi.R: flexible, quantitative and integrative genomic visualizations for publication-quality multi-panel figures BIOINFORMATICS Phanstiel, D. H., Boyle, A. P., Araya, C. L., Snyder, M. P. 2014; 30 (19): 2808-2810
  • Sushi.R: flexible, quantitative and integrative genomic visualizations for publication-quality multi-panel figures. Bioinformatics Phanstiel, D. H., Boyle, A. P., Araya, C. L., Snyder, M. P. 2014; 30 (19): 2808-2810

    Abstract

    Motivation: Interpretation and communication of genomic data require flexible and quantitative tools to analyze and visualize diverse data types, and yet, a comprehensive tool to display all common genomic data types in publication quality figures does not exist to date. To address this shortcoming, we present Sushi.R, an R/Bioconductor package that allows flexible integration of genomic visualizations into highly customizable, publication-ready, multi-panel figures from common genomic data formats including Browser Extensible Data (BED), bedGraph and Browser Extensible Data Paired-End (BEDPE). Sushi.R is open source and made publicly available through GitHub (https://github.com/dphansti/Sushi) and Bioconductor (http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/Sushi.html).mpsnyder@stanford.edu or dphansti@stanford.edu.

    View details for DOI 10.1093/bioinformatics/btu379

    View details for PubMedID 24903420

  • Whole-exome sequencing identifies tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7A (TTC7A) mutations for combined immunodeficiency with intestinal atresias JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY Chen, R., Giliani, S., Lanzi, G., Mias, G. I., Lonardi, S., Dobbs, K., Manis, J., Im, H., Gallagher, J. E., Phanstiel, D. H., Euskirchen, G., Lacroute, P., Bettinger, K., Moratto, D., Weinacht, K., Montin, D., Gallo, E., Mangili, G., Porta, F., Notarangelo, L. D., Pedretti, S., Al-Herz, W., Alfahdli, W., Comeau, A. M., Traister, R. S., Pai, S., Carella, G., Facchetti, F., Nadeau, K. C., Snyder, M., Notarangelo, L. D. 2013; 132 (3): 656-?
  • Proteomics and pluripotency CRITICAL REVIEWS IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY Brumbaugh, J., Rose, C. M., Phanstiel, D. H., Thomson, J. A., Coon, J. J. 2011; 46 (6): 493-506

    Abstract

    The fields of mass spectrometry (MS) and stem cell biology have expanded greatly in the past twenty years. Taken alone, these fields occupy entirely different branches of science; however, the points where they overlap provide valuable insight, both in the biological and technical arenas. From a biological perspective, MS-based proteomics offers the capacity to follow post-transcriptional regulation and signaling that are (1) fundamental to pluripotency and differentiation, (2) largely beyond the reach of genomic technologies, and (3) otherwise difficult or impossible to examine on a large scale. At the same time, addressing questions fundamental to stem cell biology has compelled proteomic researchers to pursue more sensitive and creative ways to probe the proteome, both in a targeted and high-throughput manner. Here, we highlight experiments that straddle proteomics and stem cell biology, with an emphasis on studies that apply mass spectrometry to dissect pluripotency and differentiation.

    View details for DOI 10.3109/10409238.2011.624491

    View details for Web of Science ID 000297334700003

    View details for PubMedID 21999516