Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Internal Medicine
  • Hospital Medicine

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Member, SHC Bylaws Committee (2015 - Present)
  • Member, Department of Medicine Quality Council (2014 - Present)
  • Medicine SIP, Stanford Hospital (2014 - Present)
  • Faculty Mentor, Core Faculty Mentoring Program (2013 - Present)
  • Director, Medicine Consult / Procedure Team Rotation (2013 - Present)
  • Hospitalist, Division of General Medical Disciplines (2012 - Present)
  • Lead Hospitalist, Stanford ValleyCare (2015 - Present)

Honors & Awards


  • Arthur L. Bloomfield Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, Stanford University Medical School (2014)
  • David A. Rytand Clinical Teaching Award, Stanford University - Department of Medicine (2014)
  • Medical Honor Society, Alpha Omega Alpha (2009)
  • Business Honor Society, Beta Gamma Sigma (2009)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Member, Society of Hospital Medicine (2013 - Present)
  • Participant, Stanford Leadership Development Program (2014 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Board Certification: Internal Medicine, American Board of Internal Medicine (2012)
  • MBA, Case Western Reserve University - Weatherhead School of Management (2009)
  • Residency:Stanford University (2012) CA
  • Medical Education:Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (2009) OH
  • BA, University of Notre Dame, Economics - Pre-Medical Studies

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


High Value Care: Leading quality improvement projects / research initiatives

Projects


  • Clinical Excellence Research Center - AIM project, Clinical Excellence Research Center (2014)

    Assisted in developing data collection tools to explore relative efficiency and quality between health groups. Developed interview guides and/or questionnaires using clinical scenarios to explore care delivery models and practice patterns for Interventional Cardiology, General Cardiology and Nephrology.
    Site Visit Lead: University of Alabama Site Visit

    Location

    94304

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - Observation Status: Denial of Admissions and Reimbursement (2013 - 2014)

    Hospital Mentor for SHCG: Understand implications of miscategorization “observation status” vs. “inpatient.” The project quantified the rate of patient miscategorization, modeled the substantial financial impact of misclassification (for patients and SHC), and developed recommendations to minimize future errors.

    Location

    United States

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - Supporting Clinically Appropriate and Cost-effective Lab Test Utilization (2013 - 2014)

    Hospital Mentor for SHCG: Lab test overutilization is a widespread challenge at virtually all medical centers, leading to substantial costs and in some cases, placing patients at risk from unnecessary follow-up tests and procedures. SHCG examined the most commonly-ordered lab tests by cost and volume to evaluate which tests are inappropriately ordered. The team provided reasons for lab test overutilization and prepared evidence-based recommendations to address this problem.

    Location

    United States

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - Barriers to Discharge for Clinical High Risk Patients (2014)

    Identified barriers to discharge for clinical high risk patients by recording reasons for delayed discharges through:
    a.Data collection at clinical high risk patient meetings
    b.Interviews of team care members (RNs, case managers, MDs, etc.)
    Examined the primary barriers to discharge and determine how/when they arise.
    a.Stratified by medical unit and patient’s primary medical condition to determine whether barriers may be unique to these factors.
    Assessed the financial burden as a result of delayed discharges.
    Formed recommendations to address these primary barriers to discharge that may be implemented in the immediate future, as well as, in the short term and long term.
    Work Presented at ACP Northern California in November 2014

    Location

    United States

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - ED Admissions Project (2013)

    Hospital Mentor for SHCG: The ED Admissions project team has studied emergency room admissions processes and the determinants of patients being admitted to telemetry and non-telemetry beds as well as patients being admitted under inpatient or observation status. By analyzing ED admissions data, conducting a wide range of interviews with key staff and stakeholders, and closely observing ED operations, the team has improved understanding of how admitted patients are currently being placed and developed recommendations for improvement.

    Location

    94304

  • Practice of Medicine - Preceptors (2012 - Present)

    Practicum preceptors have the opportunity to work with 2 different groups of students teaching history taking skills / physical examination skills.

    Location

    94304

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - Cost Per Case (2014)

    The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is a data driven collaboration among nonprofit academic medical centers across the nation. The purpose of this alliance is to drive and support better patient care by sharing data to identify areas of improvement in patient outcomes, quality of care and costs. The SHCG group project aims to understand Stanford's cost per case.

    Location

    Stanford Ca

  • SHIELD: Patient Partners Program (2014)

    A Co-Director of the Patient Partners Program, an innovative longitudinal patient-student service curriculum within SHIELD (Stanford Healthcare Innovations and Experiential Learning Directive)

    Location

    Stanford Ca

  • Stanford Healthcare Consulting Group - Follow-up Scheduling (2015)

    Location

    Stanford Ca

Teaching

2015-16 Courses


Publications

All Publications


  • Hospitalist intervention for appropriate use of telemetry reduces length of stay and cost JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE Svec, D., Ahuja, N., Evans, K. H., Hom, J., Garg, T., Loftus, P., Shieh, L. 2015; 10 (9): 627-632

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jhm.2411

    View details for Web of Science ID 000360836000012

  • Hospitalist intervention for appropriate use of telemetry reduces length of stay and cost. Journal of hospital medicine Svec, D., Ahuja, N., Evans, K. H., Hom, J., Garg, T., Loftus, P., Shieh, L. 2015; 10 (9): 627-632

    Abstract

    Telemetry monitoring is a widely used, labor-intensive, and often-limited resource. Little is known of the effectiveness of methods to guide appropriate use.Our intervention for appropriate use included: (1) a hospitalist-led, daily review of bed utilization, (2) hospitalist-driven education module for trainees, (3) quarterly feedback of telemetry usage, and (4) financial incentives.Hospitalists were encouraged to discuss daily telemetry utilization on rounds. A module on appropriate telemetry usage was taught by hospitalists during the intervention period (January 2013-August 2013) on medicine wards. Pre- and post-evaluations measured changes regarding telemetry use. We compared hospital bed-use data between the baseline period (January 2012-December 2012), intervention period, and extension period (September 2014-March 2015). During the intervention period, hospital bed-use data were sent to the hospitalist group quarterly. Financial incentives were provided after a decrease in hospitalist telemetry utilization.Stanford Hospital, a 444-bed, academic medical center in Stanford, California.Hospitalists saw reductions for both length of stay (LOS) (2.75 vs 2.13 days, P = 0.005) and total cost (22.5% reduction) for telemetry bed utilization in the intervention period. Nonhospitalists telemetry bed utilization remained unchanged. We saw significant improvements in trainee knowledge of the most cost-saving action (P = 0.002) and the least cost-saving action (P = 0.003) in the pre- and post-evaluation analyses. Results were sustained in the hospitalist group, with telemetry LOS of 1.93 days in the extension period.A multipronged, hospitalist-driven intervention to improve appropriate use of telemetry reduces LOS and cost, and increases knowledge of cost-saving actions among trainees. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2015. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

    View details for DOI 10.1002/jhm.2411

    View details for PubMedID 26149105

  • The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone on Zucker rats selected for fat food preference Physiology & Behavior Pham J, Porter J, Svec D, Eiswirth C, Svec F. 2000; 70 (5): 431-41

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