School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 88 Results

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Andrew J. Connolly

    Andrew J. Connolly

    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Cardiovascular pathology using patient material and animal models

  • Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Walter Clifford Chidester and Elsa Rooney Chidester Professor of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Vascular biology, arterial remodeling, aneurysm development; innovative treatment strategies for AAA, animal models of arterial disease, arterial remodeling and flow changes in spinal cord injury, genetic regulation of arterial aneurysm formation

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My lab is deeply interested in understand how living cells sense and respond to mechanical stimuli.

  • Gerald Fuller

    Gerald Fuller

    Fletcher Jones II Professor in the School of Engineering

    Bio The processing of complex liquids (polymers, suspensions, emulsions, biological fluids) alters their microstructure through orientation and deformation of their constitutive elements. In the case of polymeric liquids, it is of interest to obtain in situ measurements of segmental orientation and optical methods have proven to be an excellent means of acquiring this information. Research in our laboratory has resulted in a number of techniques in optical rheometry such as high-speed polarimetry (birefringence and dichroism) and various microscopy methods (fluorescence, phase contrast, and atomic force microscopy).

    Another application of orientation dynamics is in the development of solar cells. The efficiency of second-generation solar cells fabricated with conjugated polymers is limited by photoelectron transport within the polymer film. Inspired by electrorheological fluids, an external electric field is applied to the film to induce anisotropy in polymer crystallites, which is expected to enhance electron mobility.

    The microstructure of polymeric and other complex materials also cause them to have interesting physical properties and respond to different flow conditions in unusual manners. In our laboratory, we are equipped with instruments that are able to characterize these materials such as shear rheometer, capillary break up extensional rheometer, and 2D extensional rheometer. Then, the response of these materials to different flow conditions can be visualized and analyzed in detail using high speed imaging devices at up to 2,000 frames per second.

    There are numerous processes encountered in nature and industry where the deformation of fluid-fluid interfaces is of central importance. Examples from nature include deformation of the red blood cell in small capillaries, cell division and structure and composition of the tear film. Industrial applications include the processing of emulsions and foams, and the atomization of droplets in ink-jet printing. In our laboratory, fundamental research is in progress to understand the orientation and deformation of monolayers at the molecular level. These experiments employ state of the art optical methods such as polarization modulated dichroism, fluorescence microscopy, and Brewster angle microscopy to obtain in situ measurements of polymer films and small molecule amphiphile monolayers subject to flow. Langmuir troughs are used as the experimental platform so that the thermodynamic state of the monolayers can be systematically controlled. For the first time, well characterized, homogeneous surface flows have been developed, and real time measurements of molecular and microdomain orientation have been obtained. These microstructural experiments are complemented by measurements of the macroscopic, mechanical properties of the films.