School of Medicine

Showing 11-20 of 81 Results

  • Raiyan T. Zaman

    Raiyan T. Zaman

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My academic and scientific training has been focused on design and development of novel fiber-optic based biomedical instrumentation to improve the detection and, intervention, and treatment of various diseases. Currently, I am on a Western State Affiliate Winter 2013 Postdoctoral Fellowship from the American Heart Association (AHA) at the Stanford University School of Medicine in the laboratory of Professors Lei Xing and Michael V. McConnell, where I developed a novel fiber-optic catheter based optical imaging system to detect vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in carotid arteries. In this work, I developed a novel scintillating balloon which can detect the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque from stable plaque with high sensitivity after 18F-FDG uptake by the macrophages within the thin cap fibro atheroma (TCFA). The TCFA causes 60-70% of acute coronary syndrome that leads to sudden cardiac death and myocardial infarction.

  • Roham Zamanian, MD, FCCP

    Roham Zamanian, MD, FCCP

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. The Utility of S100A4/Mts1 as a Biomarker in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH).

    2. Prevalence and Treatment of Insulin Resistance in PAH.

    3. The Effect of EGF-Receptor Blockade and Elastase Inhibitor on Pulmonary Arteries of Patients with PAH.

    4. Characterization of Pulmonary Arteries in Patients with Idiopathic and Secondary PAH by Wedge Angiography.

    5. The Optimal Angle for Angiographic Evaluation of the Left Pulmonary Artery in Patients with PAH.

  • Dick Zare

    Dick Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Bio My research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

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