School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 20 Results

  • Laura K. Bachrach

    Laura K. Bachrach

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Prevention of osteoporosis begins in childhood and adolescence by measures that maximize acquistion of bone mineral during the critical adolescent years. Body mass, calcium nutriture, physical activity, growth and sex steroid hormones, and genetic factors are all thought to be important determinants of bone mass although the relative contribution of each remains controversial.

  • Bruce Buckingham

    Bruce Buckingham

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My major interest is in type 1 diabetes mellitus, continuous glucose sensor, and the development of an artificial pancreas. Other research interests include using continuous glucose monitoring and algorithms to control blood glucose levels in intensive care units.

  • Stephanie Crossen

    Stephanie Crossen

    Postdoctoral Medical fellow, Endocrinology and Metabolism

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Crossen’s research focuses on identifying patterns in ambulatory care that are associated with recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) among pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Crossen is collaborating with colleagues at Stanford’s Center for Policy, Outcomes, and Prevention (CPOP) and using data from the California Children’s Services (CCS) program. She hopes to design and pilot case-management strategies for DKA prevention in the future based on results of this research.

  • Brian Feldman

    Brian Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The overall goal of our research is to understand on both a molecular and systemic level how hormones regulate stem cell fate decisions and the role these pathways play in both physiology and disease. We use molecular biology and in vivo models to elucidate mechanisms of regulating cell fate determination by the endocrine system. Understanding these processes has profound and broad implications for both science and health.

  • Korey Hood, PhD

    Korey Hood, PhD

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics - Endocrinology and Diabetes

    Bio Dr. Hood directs NIH- and foundation-funded clinical research aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. There are two main threads to his work: 1) construct prevention and treatment programs to address modifiable psychological and family factors that create barriers to optimal management of type 1 diabetes, and 2) optimize the use of diabetes devices and technologies to improve outcomes. With regard to the first thread, Dr. Hood has successfully implemented depression screening programs in tertiary pediatric diabetes clinics within a Quality Improvement framework, and is currently conducting a large scale clinical trial on a depression prevention program for teens with type 1 diabetes. From a device and technology standpoint, Dr. Hood coordinates the Human Factors assessments in Drs. Buckingham and Ly’s closed loop studies and is recognized as one of the experts in this area nationally and internationally. In addition, he has implemented Human Factors assessments in local and national (e.g., T1D Exchange) studies and registries. These assessments focus on uptake of devices and technologies, and determining strategies to promote uptake and optimize their use. Dr. Hood and his research team have published over 70 scientific articles on these topics and are active presenters at diabetes, behavioral medicine, and advocacy conferences.

    Dr. Hood also works closely with people with diabetes in clinical and service settings. Dr. Hood is a licensed clinical psychologist and is part of the diabetes care team at Stanford. He is also the chair of the American Diabetes Association’s Behavioral Medicine and Psychology Interest Group, is on editorial boards for Diabetes Care and the Journal of Pediatric Psychology, and assists with programming for JDRF and Children With Diabetes events. Dr. Hood is the author of a book entitled Type 1 Teens: A Guide to Managing Your Life with Diabetes and an ADA book (with Drs. Harris and Weissberg-Benchell) for clinicians working with teens with diabetes. All of these efforts are aimed at improving the quality of life and health outcomes of people with diabetes and their families.


    Complete List of Published Work in My Bibliography (may need to copy and paste link in your browser):
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/korey.hood.1/bibliography/41146264/public/?sort=date&direction=ascending

Stanford Medicine Resources: