School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 22 Results

  • Oxana Palesh

    Oxana Palesh

    Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research focused on developing interventions for management of side effects of cancer treatments (e.g., sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety).

  • Theo Palmer

    Theo Palmer

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests For most areas of the mammalian brain, the production of new nerve cells or neurons is restricted to fetal development. However, there are exceptions to the rule. Some areas of the brain continue to make new neurons throughout life. This neurogenesis is mediated by neural stem cells and our research goals are to understand how stem cell activity and fate are controlled. Ultimately, we hope to harness the nascent potential of stem cells to treat neurological injury and disease.

  • Peter Parham

    Peter Parham

    Professor of Structural Biology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Parham laboratory investigates the biology, genetics, and evolution of MHC class I molecules and NK cell receptors.

  • Walter Park, MD

    Walter Park, MD

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Park's research interests are in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cysts, acute and chronic pancreatitis. His approach incorporates methods in health services research including the use of observational datasets, cost-effectiveness studies, and the development of clinical cohorts.

  • Jane Parnes

    Jane Parnes

    Professor of Medicine, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The lab is studying the mechanisms controlling B cell responsiveness and the balance between tolerance and autoimmunity. B cells deficient in CD72 are hyperresponsive to stimulation through the B cell receptor. We are examining the alterations in B cell signaling in these B cells and the mechanisms by which CD72 deficiency partially abrogates anergic tolerance. We hope to learn how deficiency in CD72 leads to spontaneous autoimmunity and increased susceptibility to induced autoimmune disease.

  • Julie Parsonnet

    Julie Parsonnet

    George DeForest Barnett Professor in Medicine and Professor of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I am interested in the long-term consequences of chronic interactions between the human host and the microbial world. Recently, we have focused most heavily on Helicobacter pylori, tuberculosis and helminth infections. I also remain strongly interested in diarrheal diseases, particularly in the developing world, and in sanitation and hygiene.

  • John M. Pauly

    John M. Pauly

    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    Bio Interests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

  • Kim Butts Pauly

    Kim Butts Pauly

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We are investigating the use of focused ultrasound for neuromodulation of the brain for direct stimulation and inhibition of the brain for preclinical mapping of brain function, reduction of epileptic seizures, and for general study of the brain. We are using focused ultrasound to open the blood brain barrier in order to enhance drug delivery to cancers of the brain. We are also using focused ultrasound to thermally ablate tissue for movement disorders such as essential tremor, as well as for cancers in the body.

    In addition to the basic science study of neuromodulation and cancer treatment, we are also engineering key MRI methods that enable monitoring these interventions, include MR thermometry, MR-acoustic radiation force imaging, and phase aberration correction using a combined approach of simulation and ultrashort echo time MRI imaging of bone.

  • Christopher K. Payne, MD

    Christopher K. Payne, MD

    Professor of Urology at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Obstetric Fistula Projects:
    1. Preoperative ultrasound evaluation to detect ureteric involvement in vesicovaginal fistulas
    2. Patient narrative study to identify key medical, social and economic factors that lead to fistula formation
    3. Study of urinary continence after fistula repair

    Pelvic pain: investigation into role of pelvic floor in chronic pelvic pain

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