School of Medicine


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  • Sonia Partap

    Sonia Partap

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests involve the epidemiology, treatment and diagnosis of pediatric and young adult brain tumors. I am also interested in long-term neurologic effects and designing clinical trials to treat brain and spinal cord tumors.

  • Josef Parvizi MD PhD

    Josef Parvizi MD PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Dr Parvizi completed his medical internship at Mayo Clinic and Neurology Residency at BIDMC Harvard Medical School before joining the UCLA for fellowship training in clinical neurophysiology and epilepsy. He has worked at Stanford University Medical Center since 2007 and specializes in treating patients with uncontrollable seizures. Dr. Parvizi is the principal investigator in the Laboratory of Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience whose research activities have been supported by National Institute of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations. To find out more about Dr Parvizi's scholarly activities please visit http://med.stanford.edu/parvizi-lab.html.

  • Addie Peretz, MD

    Addie Peretz, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Peretz's research interests include understanding the biological underpinnings of migraine and chronic daily headaches. She also participates in clinical trials of new headache treatments.

  • Todd Peterson

    Todd Peterson

    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Neurology and Neurological Sciences

    Bio After receiving my Bachelors (2006) and Masters (2010) degrees at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, I obtained my PhD at Southern Illinois University in 2013. My current research focuses on the central nervous systems response to insult.

    I am interested in understanding the complex cellular and molecular interactions that comprise the neuroinflammatory response to neural injury in an effort to develop therapeutic treatment options that produce the most optimal response to multiple types of neural insult and other neurobiological disorders. The World Health Organization reports that neurological disorders are one of the greatest threats to public health. Of the hundreds of these disorders, some of the most common are traumatic brain injury, stroke, and degenerative disorders. Although these disorders are initiated through different causes, the common underlying factor in all of these neurodegenerative diseases is neuroinflammation. The acute response is characterized by glial cell activation, oxidative stress, and edema, all of which lead to increased tissue damage. Chronic neuroinflammation is a sustained, self-perpetuating response that persists long after the onset of neural insult. There is a complex interaction between resident immune cells like microglia and astrocytes and infiltrating immune cells including neutrophils, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. This complicated response to neural injury is a defense mechanism to remove harmful agents and promote recovery, but when over active, it can contribute to further damage. My current objective is to identify the underlying mechanisms of the neuroinflammatory response in multiple different animal models of injury and neurobiological disorders. Ultimately my goal is to steer a group that is running preclinical trials on cellular and molecular compounds designed to reduce the harmful features of the neuroinflammatory response but to harness the beneficial aspects.

  • Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery, at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests include the development, validation and application of functional and structural Neuroimaging techniques to be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  • David Prince

    David Prince

    Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor in Neurology and the Neurological Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Experiments examine
    1)intrinsic properties of neuronal membranes; actions of neurotransmitters that regulate neocortical and thalamic excitability
    2) chronic epileptogenesis following cortical injury; changes in intracortical connectivity and receptors;
    3) effects of early injury and activity on cortical development/maldevelopment Electrophysiological, anatomical and pharmacological techniques employed.
    4. prophylaxis of postraumatic epilepsy
    5. Neocortical interneuronal function/modulation