School of Medicine


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  • Maxence Nachury

    Maxence Nachury

    Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the primary cilium, a surface-exposed organelle required for vision, olfaction and developmental signaling and whose dysfunction leads to obesity, skeletal malformations and kidney cysts. To decode the fundamental principles of ciliary trafficking and to understand how trafficking shapes signaling at the primary cilium, we leverage a broad expertise in biochemistry, proteomics, cell biology and in vitro reconstitution.

  • Andrew Nager

    Andrew Nager

    Postdoctoral Research fellow, Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The primary cilium is a membrane-ensheathed projection on the surface of most mammalian cells that receives environmental cues and performs critical roles in development and tissue homeostasis. A hallmark of ciliary signaling is the trafficking of activated signaling components from the cilium. My work focuses on the mechanisms that orchestrate these trafficking events.

  • William Nelson

    William Nelson

    Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.