School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 24 Results

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Associate Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens such as CMV, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Yvonne Maldonado

    Yvonne Maldonado

    Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Health Research and Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focuses on epidemiologic aspects of viral vaccines and perinatal HIV infection. This includes the molecular epidemiology of factors affecting the immunogenicity of oral polio vaccine (OPV) in developing areas of the world, and now the epidemiology of transmission and circulation of vaccine derived polioviruses in order to assist in global eradication of polio. I also work in development of methods to prevent breastfeeding transmission of HIV in Africa.

  • Sanjay V. Malhotra, PhD

    Sanjay V. Malhotra, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on the design and discovery of synthetic, and natural product inspired small molecules which can be used as probes for developing understanding of biological phenomena, including protein-protein interactions and modulation of signal transduction pathways. My laboratory employs the tools of synthetic medicinal chemistry, molecular modeling and chemical biology for translational research in drug discovery, development, imaging and radiation.

  • Neyssa Marina

    Neyssa Marina

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Germ cell tumors and bone sarcomas.

  • M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    M. Peter Marinkovich, MD

    Associate Professor of Dermatology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Marinkovich lab studies the function of epithelial extracellular matrix molecules, including integrins, collagens and laminins in epithelial development and carcinoma progression. We apply our discoveries in this area towards development of molecular therapies for carcinomas, hair disease and inherited epithelial adhesive disorders.

  • Olivia Martinez

    Olivia Martinez

    Professor (Research) of Surgery (Transplantation)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Host-Pathogen interactions; EBV B cell lymphomas; pathways of immune evasion in the growth and survival of EBV B cell lymphomas; mechanisms of graft rejection and tolerance induction; stem cell and solid organ transplantation.

  • Jennifer A McNab

    Jennifer A McNab

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research is focused on developing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that probe the structural and functional micro-architecture of the brain. This requires new MRI contrast mechanisms, strategic encoding and reconstruction schemes, physiological monitoring, brain tissue modeling and validation. Applications of these methods include neurodevelopment, plasticity, aging, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and many other neurological conditions.

  • Elizabeth Mellins

    Elizabeth Mellins

    Professor of Pediatrics (Human Gene Therapy) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Molecular mechanisms and intracellular pathways of antigen processing and presentation; structure/function of HLA-DR,-DM, -DO; mechanisms underlying HLA allele association with disease; disease mechanisms in systemic idiopathic juveile arthritis, recently found to be an HLA-linked disease.

  • Nicholas Melosh

    Nicholas Melosh

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    Bio Melosh's research is focused on developing methods to detect and control chemical processes on the nanoscale, to create materials that are responsive to their local environment. The research goal incorporates many of the hallmarks of biological adaptability, based on feedback control between cellular receptors and protein expression. Similar artificial networks may be achieved by fabricating arrays of nanoscale devices that can detect and influence their local surroundings through ionic potential, temperature, mechanical motion, capacitance, or electrochemistry. These devices are particularly suited as smart biomaterials, where multiple surface-cell interactions must be monitored and adjusted simultaneously for optimal cell adhesion and growth. Other interests include precise control over self-assembled materials, and potential methods to monitor the diagnostics of complicated chemical systems, such as the effect of drug treatments within patients.

    Research Interests:
    Molecular materials at interfaces
    Directed dynamic self-assembly
    Controlling molecular or biomolecular assembly and behavior
    Influence of local electronic, optical or thermal stimuli

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