School of Medicine

Showing 1-10 of 16 Results

  • Sean Mackey, MD, PhD

    Sean Mackey, MD, PhD

    Redlich Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Functional neuroimaging of pain. Imaging of cognitive and affective dimensions of pain, neural plasticity contributing to chronic pain and effects of treatment.

    Effects of membrane stabilizing medications on neuropathic pain.

    Chronic pain outcomes tools development and measurement.

  • Holden Maecker

    Holden Maecker

    Associate Professor (Research) of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests I'm interested in immune monitoring of T cell responses to chronic pathogens such as CMV, and the correlation of T cell response signatures with disease protection.

  • Kenneth Mahaffey

    Kenneth Mahaffey

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio Clinical Focus: Cardiovascular Medicine

    Research Focus:

    My primary research interest is the design and conduct of multicenter clinical trials and analyses of important clinical cardiac issues using large patient databases. My research focuses on novel anticoagulation agents for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and atrial fibrillation, the study of agents targeted to protect the myocardium during reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction, and the evaluation of cardiovascular safety of diabetic therapies. I am also interested in the methodology of clinical trials. Current research activities include standardization of the definition of myocardial infarction used in clinical trials, the adjudication of suspected clinical endpoint events by Clinical Event Committees (CEC), and the efficient operational conduct of large multinational clinical trials.

    Administrative Focus: Vice Chair of Clinical Research in the Department of Medicine and Member of the Stanford IRB

    Professional Training:

    1985 Stanford University, BS Chemistry
    1989 University of Washington, MD
    1993 University of Arizona, Internship/Residency/Chief Residency
    1996 Duke University, Fellowship in Cardiology
    1996 Duke University, Faculty in Cardiology
    2013 Stanford University, Vice Chair of Clinical Research, Department of Medicine

  • Sanjay V. Malhotra, PhD

    Sanjay V. Malhotra, PhD

    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiation Oncology (Radiation and Cancer Biology) and of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research interests focus on the design and discovery of synthetic, and natural product inspired small molecules which can be used as probes for developing understanding of biological phenomena, including protein-protein interactions and modulation of signal transduction pathways. My laboratory employs the tools of synthetic medicinal chemistry, molecular modeling and chemical biology for translational research in drug discovery, development, imaging and radiation.

  • Alison Marsden, PhD

    Alison Marsden, PhD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab at Stanford develops novel computational methods for the study of cardiovascular disease progression, surgical methods, and medical devices. We have a particular interest in pediatric cardiology, and use virtual surgery to design novel surgical concepts for children born with heart defects.

  • Matthew Mell

    Matthew Mell

    Associate Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Dr. Mell's research interest focus on comparative effectiveness of health care delivery for complex surgical diseases, including optimizing outcomes and cost effectiveness.

    Dr. Mell's clinical interests include all aspects of vascular surgery, with a special emphasis on surgery for complex aortic disease, including endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  • Mark Mercola, PhD

    Mark Mercola, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Bio Dr. Mercola is Professor of Medicine and Professor in the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He completed postdoctoral training at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, was on the faculty in the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School for 12 years, and later at the Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Institute and Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego before relocating to Stanford in 2015.

    Prof. Mercola is known for identifying many of the factors that are responsible for inducing and forming the heart, including the discovery that Wnt inhibition is a critical step in cardiogenesis that provided the conceptual basis and reagents for the large-scale production of cardiovascular tissues from pluripotent stem cells. He has collaborated with medicinal chemists, optical engineers and software developers to pioneer the use of patient iPSC-cardiomyocytes for disease modeling, safety pharmacology and drug development. His academic research is focused on developing and using quantitative assays of patient-specific cardiomyocyte function to discover druggable targets for preserving contractile function in heart failure and promoting regeneration following ischemic injury.

    He established drug screening and assay development at the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, which operated as one of 4 large screening centers of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) Molecular Libraries screening initiative and continues as one of the largest academic drug screening centers. He co-founded two companies, ChemRegen, Inc., a start-up dedicated to developing small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications, and EpikaBio, Inc., dedicated to developing a device for myocardial regeneration.

    Prof. Mercola received an NIH MERIT award for his work on heart formation, and authored over 120 papers. He holds numerous patents, including describing the invention of the first engineered dominant negative protein and small molecules for stem cell and cancer applications. He serves on multiple editorial and advisory boards, including Vala Sciences (San Diego), Stem Cell Theranostics (Palo Alto) and the Human Biomolecular Research Institute (San Diego). His laboratory is funded by the NIH, California Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the Fondation Leducq.