School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 18 Results

  • Stephen J. Galli, MD

    Stephen J. Galli, MD

    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and the expression of mast cell and basophil function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease.

  • Hayley Gans

    Hayley Gans

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Infectious Diseases

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The focus of my laboratory is the immune response to viral vaccines evaluating the ontogeny of responses in infants and limitations in immunocompromised hosts. We have studied responses to an early two-dose measles immunization, one versus 2 doses of varicella immunization, and polio vaccine in preterm versus term infants. Other active areas of research include measles and varicella immunity in HIV infected individuals, and transplant recipients.

  • Joseph Garner

    Joseph Garner

    Associate Professor of Comparative Medicine and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The medical research community has long recognized that “good well-being is good science”. The lab uses an integrated interdisciplinary approach, best described as developmental neuroethology, to explore this interface, while providing tangible deliverables for the well-being of human patients and research animals.

  • Margot Gerritsen

    Margot Gerritsen

    Associate Professor of Energy Resources Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering and of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Research
    My work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems. My research focuses on the design of highly accurate and efficient parallel computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. I'm particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. These recovery methods are extremely challenging to simulate because of the very strong nonlinearities in the governing equations. Outside petroleum engineering, I'm active in coastal ocean simulation with colleagues from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, yacht research and pterosaur flight mechanics with colleagues from the Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, and the design of search algorithms in collaboration with the Library of Congress and colleagues from the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering.

    Teaching
    I teach courses in both energy related topics (reservoir simulation, energy, and the environment) in my department, and mathematics for engineers through the Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME). I also initiated two courses in professional development in our department (presentation skills and teaching assistant training), and a consulting course for graduate students in ICME, which offers expertise in computational methods to the Stanford community and selected industries.

    Professional Activities
    Director, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering; Stanford Fellow (2010-2012); Magne Espedal Professor II, Bergen University (2011-2014); Aldo Leopold Fellow (2009); Chair, SIAM Activity group in Geosciences (2007, present, reelected in 2009); Faculty Research Fellow, Clayman Institute (2008); Elected to Council of Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) (2007); organizing committee, 2008 Gordon Conference on Flow in Porous Media; producer, Smart Energy podcast channel; director, Stanford Yacht Research; co-director and founder, Stanford Center of Excellence for Computational Algorithms in Digital Stewardship; editor, Journal of Small Craft Technology; associate editor, Transport in Porous Media; reviewer for various journals and organizations including SPE, DoE, NSF, Journal of Computational Physics, Journal of Scientific Computing, Transport in Porous Media, Computational Geosciences; member, SIAM, SPE, KIVI, AGU, and APS

  • Amato J. Giaccia

    Amato J. Giaccia

    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, and by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests During the last five years, we have identified several small molecules that kill VHL deficient renal cancer cells through a synthetic lethal screening approach. Another major interest of my laboratory is in identifying hypoxia-induced genes involved in invasion and metastases. We are also investigating how hypoxia regulates gene expression epigenetically.

  • Bertil Glader

    Bertil Glader

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology) and, by courtesy, of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Hematology/Oncology, biology, and treatment of bone marrow failure disorders, hereditary coagulation disorders-clinical trials.

  • Neville H. Golden M.D.

    Neville H. Golden M.D.

    The Marron and Mary Elizabeth Kendrick Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research has focused on the medical complications of adolescents with eating disorders. My specific area of study has been the etiology and implications of amenorrhea in adolescents with eating disorders, in particular the management of reduced bone mass and osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.

  • Jeffrey Gould

    Jeffrey Gould

    Robert L. Hess Professor in Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Population-based studies related to neonatal and perinatal diseases.

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

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