School of Medicine


Showing 2,251-2,260 of 2,828 Results

  • David Schneider

    David Schneider

    Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests We study innate immunity and microbial pathogenesis. We have been studying models for a variety of bacterial infections including: Listeria, Mycobacteria, Salmonella and Streptococcus as well as some fungi, malaria and viruses. Our current focus is to determine how we recover from infections.

  • Logan Schneider, MD

    Logan Schneider, MD

    Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine

    Bio Dr. Logan Schneider specializes in the treatment of sleep disorders, which include things like sleep apnea, narcolepsy, insomnia, restless legs syndrome, sleepwalking, and REM-sleep behavior disorder. He has practiced Sleep Neurology for more than 5 years. Dr. Schneider has a special interest in REM-sleep behavior disorder and other parasomnias (such as sleepwalking).

  • Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Ingela Schnittger, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My main research continues to be in the field of echocardiography. Several areas of research are currently being pursued.

  • Gary Schoolnik

    Gary Schoolnik

    Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Structure-function analysis of bacterial adhesion proteins and toxins; design and synthesis of synthetic antigens; immunobiology of human papillomaviruses

  • Donald Schreiber, MD

    Donald Schreiber, MD

    Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research group focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies including acute myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure. We have evaluated novel cardiac markers and point-of-care testing in clinical practice. Current projects also include the diagnosis and treatment of acute pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis. Other interests include spinal cord injury, pneumonia and sepsis.

  • Alan Schroeder

    Alan Schroeder

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    Bio Dr. Schroeder is the associate chief for research in the division of pediatric hospital medicine at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, and an associate clinical professor in the division of hospital medicine and the division of critical care. His research interests focus on identifying areas where we can “safely do less” in healthcare, and frequently lectures on this theme locally and nationally. Dr. Schroeder is currently involved in multiple projects involving common conditions in pediatrics such as head trauma, bronchiolitis, UTI, meningitis, and febrile infant management. He is a co-chair of the Lown RightCare Alliance Pediatric Council, co-chair of the Academic Pediatric Association’s Healthcare Value Special Interest Group, an editor of the Yearbook of Pediatrics and an assistant editor for the journal Hospital Pediatrics. Dr. Schroeder provides clinical care for children in the PICU and the pediatric ward and has won multiple teaching awards.

  • John S. Schroeder, MD

    John S. Schroeder, MD

    Professor (Clinical) of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests 1. Clinical Pharmocology of Cardiovascular Drugs
    (a) Calcium Channel Blockers
    (b) Agents for Heart Failure
    (c) Anti-atherosclerotic Effects of Cardiovascular Drugs, e.g. Calcium Channel Blockers

    2. Cardiac Transplantation/Congestive Heart Failure

    3. Coronary Artery Spasm

  • Liora Schultz

    Liora Schultz

    Instructor, Pediatrics - Stem Cell Transplantation

    Bio I am currently postdoctoral research fellow pursuing immunotherapy research in the oncology department at Stanford University. My clinical training as a pediatric hematology oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center highlighted the desperate need for novel therapeutic options for a subtype of aggressive pediatric leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). Despite our best standard of care for AML, long term survival rates range from 50-60% with an unacceptably high relapse rate of 40%. The urgent need for novel treatments inspired me to pursue a research project in adoptive immunotherapy, genetically modifying Tcells to express artificial T cell receptors, termed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), that target AML specific antigens. In parallel to my clinical training, I constructed an AML specific CAR and demonstrated its ability to redirect T cell function mediating eradication of AML cells. As the field of CAR therapy rapidly advances, novel methods to optimize this therapeutic modality are imperative. To this end, supported by research demonstrating superior antitumor function of naïve derived effector T cells compared to central memory derived effector T cells, I am investigating whether preferential modification of naïve T cells to express CARs will generate a T cell subpopulation with increased efficacy. Consolidating my clinical and research experiences within highly academic institutes allows me to synthesize my pursuit of scientific rigor and commitment to the field of oncology, with a mission to achieve productive research and translatable results.