School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 96 Results

  • John R. Adler, MD

    John R. Adler, MD

    The Dorothy and Thye King Chan Professor in Neurosurgery, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The development and implementation of computerized, image-guided surgical tools to be used during minimally invasive brain operations. The clinical outcome of new technologies, and in particular the application of radiosurgery, for the treatment of brain tumors. The creation of new radiosurgical techniques for a wide array of brain and spine disorders.

  • Gregory W. Albers, MD

    Gregory W. Albers, MD

    The Coyote Foundation Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Our group’s research focus is the acute treatment and prevention of cerebrovascular disorders. Our primary interest is the use of diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI to expand the treatment window for ischemic stroke. We are also conducting clinical studies of both neuroprotective and thrombolytic strategies for the treatment of acute stroke and investigating new antithrombotic strategies for stroke prevention.

  • Geoff Appelboom, M.D. Ph.D.

    Geoff Appelboom, M.D. Ph.D.

    Clinical Instructor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Dr Appelboom is Clinical Instructor of Neurosurgery at Stanford. Dr Appelboom is focused on advancing minimally invasive surgical techniques for diseases of the brain and spine.

    Dr Appelboom is a surgeon scientist. He spent 3 years of integrated PhD research at Columbia University Medical Center to study genetic predictors of vascular fragility. Dr Appelboom has authored over 60 peer reviewed publications in international journals including Stroke, Translational Stroke Research, Current Atherosclerosis Reports, and Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. He has also completed a master in stereotactic neurosurgery at La Sorbonne University in Paris. Dr Appelboom’s research efforts include utilization of MR guided technologies such as stereotactic radiosurgery and focused ultrasound.

    Dr Appelboom is a Stanford faculty with an entrepreneurial spirit. He was selected to be a 2017 Faculty Fellow at the Byers Center for Biodesign. The program provides the most in-depth training experience in health technology innovation with a multidisciplinary experience that involve hands-on health technology projects with the help of Biodesign faculty and industry experts.

  • Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Nikolas Blevins, MD

    Larry and Sharon Malcolmson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Inner ear microendoscopy -- Developing techniques for minimally-invasive imaging of inner ear microanatomy and neural pysiology. Applications include improved cochlear implant development, inner ear regenerative techniques, inner ear surgery, and auditory physiology.

    Microsurgical robotics -- Developing scalable microsurgical instrumentation and robotic techniques for use in head and neck surgery.

    Surgical Simulation -- Immersive environment for temporal bone surgical simulation.

  • Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    Helen Bronte-Stewart, MD, MS

    John E. Cahill Family Professor, Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests My research focus is human motor control and brain pathophysiology in movement disorders. Our overall goal is to understand the role of the basal ganglia electrical activity in the pathogenesis of movement disorders. We have developed novel computerized technology to measure fine, limb and postural movement. With these we are measuring local field potentials in basal ganglia nuclei in patients with Parkinson's disease and dystonian and correlating brain signalling with motor behavior.

  • Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Marion S. Buckwalter, MD, PhD

    Associate Professor of Neurology and of Neurosurgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests The goal of the Buckwalter Lab is to improve how people recover after a stroke. We use basic research to understand the cells, proteins, and genes that lead to successful recovery of function, and also how complications develop that impact quality of life after stroke. Ongoing projects are focused on understanding how inflammatory responses are regulated after a stroke and how to make recovery faster and better after stroke.

  • Pak H. Chan

    Pak H. Chan

    The James R. Doty Professor in Neurosurgery and Neurosciences, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Neuronal death and regeneration after strokeand neural injury

  • Steven D. Chang, MD

    Steven D. Chang, MD

    Robert C. and Jeannette Powell Neurosciences Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests Clinical research includes studies in the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders, such as aneurysms and AVMs, as well as the use of radiosurgery to treat tumors and vascular malformations of the brain and spine.

    Dr. Chang is C0-Director of the Cyberknife Radiosurgery Program.

    Dr. Chang is also the head of the The Stanford Neuromolecular Innovation Program with the goal of developing new technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by neurological conditions.

  • Navjot Chaudhary

    Navjot Chaudhary

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurosurgery

    Bio Nav Chaudhary, MD, FRCSC, is a Clinical Associate Professor of Neurosurgery. She received her medical degree from McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada. Dr. Chaudhary completed her neurosurgery residency at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada and fellowships in Spine Neurosurgery and Cyberknife Radiosurgery at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    She works primarily in CyberKnife Neurosurgery at the Stanford Cancer Center, predominantly treating patients with brain and spine tumors, brain and spine arteriovenous malformations, and trigeminal neuralgia.

    Her research interests include surgical outcomes. She has co-authored several papers relating to spine conditions, vascular malformations, and brain tumor management.

  • Lu Chen

    Lu Chen

    Professor of Neurosurgery and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests What distinguishes us humans from other animals is our ability to undergo complex behavior. The synapses are the structural connection between neurons that mediates the communication between neurons, which underlies our various cognitive function. My research program aims to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie synapse function during behavior in the developing and mature brain, and how synapse function is altered during mental retardation.