Bio

Clinical Focus


  • Pediatric Neurosurgery
  • Brain Tumors
  • Surgical epilepsy
  • Neuroendoscopy
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation
  • Minimally invasive craniosynostosis
  • Moya-moya disease

Academic Appointments


Administrative Appointments


  • Division Chief, Pediatric Neurosurgery (2014 - Present)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations


  • Section Editor, Neurosurgery (2014 - Present)
  • Education Chair, American Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery (2013 - Present)
  • Committee on Trauma, American College of Surgeons (2012 - Present)
  • Member at Large, Executive Commitee, Section of Pediatric Neurosurgery (2014 - Present)
  • Executive Committee, Congress of Neurological Surgeons (2014 - Present)

Professional Education


  • Fellowship:University of Washington (2002) WA
  • Residency:University of Washington (2001) WA
  • Internship:University of Washington (1995) WA
  • Board Certification: Pediatric Neurological Surgery, American Board of Pediatric Neurological Surgery (2008)
  • Board Certification: Neurological Surgery, American Board of Neurological Surgery (2005)
  • Medical Education:Stanford University School of Medicine (1994) CA
  • Bachelor of Sciences, Duke University, Neurosciences (1989)

Community and International Work


  • Stanford Neurosurgery in Uganda, Mulago Hospital

    Topic

    Pediatric Neurosurgery/Endoscopy

    Partnering Organization(s)

    Duke University

    Populations Served

    Uganda

    Location

    International

    Ongoing Project

    Yes

    Opportunities for Student Involvement

    Yes

Research & Scholarship

Current Research and Scholarly Interests


Dr. Grant directs a Blood-brain Barrier Translational Laboratory focusing on enhancing drug delivery to brain tumors in children.

Teaching

2014-15 Courses


Publications

Journal Articles


  • Preface to clinical neurosurgery volume 61, proceedings of the congress of neurological surgeons 2013 annual meeting. Neurosurgery Grant, G. A., Hankinson, T., Muh, C., Dumont, A., Cheshier, S. 2014; 61: N1-?

    View details for DOI 10.1227/NEU.0000000000000442

    View details for PubMedID 25032656

  • Identification of Chiari Type I Malformation subtypes using whole genome expression profiles and cranial base morphometrics BMC MEDICAL GENOMICS Markunas, C. A., Lock, E., Soldano, K., Cope, H., Ding, C. C., Enterline, D. S., Grant, G., Fuchs, H., Ashley-Koch, A. E., Gregory, S. G. 2014; 7
  • Genome Sequencing of SHH Medulloblastoma Predicts Genotype-Related Response to Smoothened Inhibition CANCER CELL Kool, M., Jones, D. T., Jaeger, N., Northcott, P. A., Pugh, T. J., Hovestadt, V., Piro, R. M., Esparza, L. A., Markant, S. L., Remke, M., Milde, T., Bourdeaut, F., Ryzhova, M., Sturm, D., Pfaff, E., Stark, S., Hutter, S., Seker-Cin, H., Johann, P., Bender, S., Schmidt, C., Rausch, T., Shih, D., Reimand, J., Sieber, L., Wittmann, A., Linke, L., Witt, H., Weber, U. D., Zapatka, M., Koenig, R., Beroukhim, R., Bergthold, G., Van Sluis, P., Volckmann, R., Koster, J., Versteeg, R., Schmidt, S., Wolf, S., Lawerenz, C., Bartholomae, C. C., von Kalle, C., Unterberg, A., Herold-Mende, C., Hofer, S., Kulozik, A. E., von Deimling, A., Scheurlen, W., Felsberg, J., Reifenberger, G., Hasselblatt, M., Crawford, J. R., Grant, G. A., Jabado, N., Perry, A., Cowdrey, C., Croul, S., Zadeh, G., Korbel, J. O., Doz, F., Delattre, O., Bader, G. D., McCabe, M. G., Collins, V. P., Kieran, M. W., Cho, Y., Pomeroy, S. L., Witt, O., Brors, B., Taylor, M. D., Schueller, U., Korshunov, A., Eils, R., Wechsler-Reya, R. J., Lichter, P., Pfister, S. M. 2014; 25 (3): 393-405

    Abstract

    Smoothened (SMO) inhibitors recently entered clinical trials for sonic-hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma (SHH-MB). Clinical response is highly variable. To understand the mechanism(s) of primary resistance and identify pathways cooperating with aberrant SHH signaling, we sequenced and profiled a large cohort of SHH-MBs (n = 133). SHH pathway mutations involved PTCH1 (across all age groups), SUFU (infants, including germline), and SMO (adults). Children >3 years old harbored an excess of downstream MYCN and GLI2 amplifications and frequent TP53 mutations, often in the germline, all of which were rare in infants and adults. Functional assays in different SHH-MB xenograft models demonstrated that SHH-MBs harboring a PTCH1 mutation were responsive to SMO inhibition, whereas tumors harboring an SUFU mutation or MYCN amplification were primarily resistant.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ccr.2014.02.004

    View details for Web of Science ID 000333233400015

    View details for PubMedID 24651015

  • Reorganization and stability for motor and language areas using cortical stimulation: case example and review of the literature. Brain sciences Serafini, S., Komisarow, J. M., Gallentine, W., Mikati, M. A., Bonner, M. J., Kranz, P. G., Haglund, M. M., Grant, G. 2013; 3 (4): 1597-1614

    Abstract

    The cerebral organization of language in epilepsy patients has been studied with invasive procedures such as Wada testing and electrical cortical stimulation mapping and more recently with noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, such as functional MRI. In the setting of a chronic seizure disorder, clinical variables have been shown to contribute to cerebral language reorganization underscoring the need for language lateralization and localization procedures. We present a 14-year-old pediatric patient with a refractory epilepsy disorder who underwent two neurosurgical resections of a left frontal epileptic focus separated by a year. He was mapped extraoperatively through a subdural grid using cortical stimulation to preserve motor and language functions. The clinical history and extensive workup prior to surgery is discussed as well as the opportunity to compare the cortical maps for language, motor, and sensory function before each resection. Reorganization in cortical tongue sensory areas was seen concomitant with a new zone of ictal and interictal activity in the previous tongue sensory area. Detailed neuropsychological data is presented before and after any surgical intervention to hypothesize about the extent of reorganization between epochs. We conclude that intrahemispheric cortical plasticity does occur following frontal lobe resective surgery in a teenager with medically refractory seizures.

    View details for DOI 10.3390/brainsci3041597

    View details for PubMedID 24961623

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