MIPS Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford

2014 MIPS Molecular Imaging Seminar Series

Calendars and Scheduling

Use the links below to view event calendars and the availability and schedules of rooms.

 
Seminar 5:30 − 6:15 pm
Discussion 6:15 − 6:30 pm
Reception 6:30 − 7:00 pm
Li Ka Shing Center, Rm. LK130
Stanford University Campus

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Invited Speakers
January 9, 2014 Paula Foster, PhD
February 27, 2014 Willem Mulder, PhD - View Webcast
March 6, 2014 Ram Kumar Subramanyan, MD, PhD
April 3, 2014 Jon Shah, MD, PhD
May 1, 2014 Guanghong Chen, PhD
June 2014 (no seminar) Summer Hiatus
July 2014 (no seminar) Summer Hiatus
August 2014 (no seminar) Summer Hiatus
September 4, 2014 TBD
October 2, 2014 TBD
November 6, 2014 John Haaga, MD
December 4, 2014 TBD

 

Jan 9, 2014

Photo of Paula Foster, PhD
Paula Foster, PhD

Assist Prof, Med Biophys
Univ of Western Ontario
Title TBD

Abstract
TBD
Feb 27, 2014
Munzer

Photo of Willem Mulder, PhD
Willem Mulder, PhD

Assoc. Prof, Rad
Prof, CV Nanomedicine, AMC
Dir, Nanomedicine Program
Mount Sinai School of Medicine View Webcast
Cardiovascular Nanomedicine: From Novel Concepts to Clinical Translation

Abstract
Recent insights in the immunobiology of atherosclerosis show great potential for anti-inflammatory strategies to improve anti-atherosclerotic therapies. However, it is also clear that we will have to develop tailored therapies that spare important protective functions of the immune system. The hope is that nanotechnology will guide delivery to culprit cells and to plaque, for instance with specific engineering of drug delivery particle properties such as size, surface composition and affinity ligands. Preclinical studies investigating nanotherapeutic interventions in atherosclerosis are sparse. Our efforts are devoted towards designing and producing novel atherosclerotic-specific nanotherapeutics. We study their functionality and effects in preclinical studies using different animal models by combining traditional histological assessments of plaque phenotype, which are complemented with gene expression and immunological readouts. The imaging-based study of nanoparticle targeting in therosclerosis has been one of our key efforts the past years. The integration of noninvasive imaging readouts also allows longitudinal assessment of atherosclerotic plaque changes as function of nanotherapy treatment regimen. Nanotherapy trials in patients are very costly and difficult to execute, which restricts the number of patients that can be included. In atherosclerosis patients another major challenge includes the determination of primary endpoints, i.e. the direct effects the nanotherapy may exert on vessel wall inflammation. Therefore, the integration of clinically viable imaging endpoints is a prerequisite. In recently initiated human nanotherapy trials in human subjects we apply F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography combined with CT (FDG-PET/CT) as well as dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) as inflammation/metabolic imaging biomarkers to determine atherosclerosis drug efficacy. The above-described integration of engineering, nanotechnology, immunology and cardiovascular may yield precision diagnostics and efficient therapeutics for atherosclerosis and its ischemic complications.
Mar 6, 2014
Munzer

Photo of Ram Kumar Subramanyan, MD, PhD
Ram Kumar Subramanyan, MD, PhD

Asst. Prof, Surgery
USC
Laboratory Cardiovascular Imaging in Development and Disease

Abstract
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Laboratory research aimed at understanding the cause and treatment of cardiovascular disorders holds the promise of bringing novel therapy for the future. Imaging modalities with application in small animal models that can precisely replicate clinical imaging techniques are necessary to carry out translational research in the laboratory setting. Several recent advances in imaging modalities have made this more feasible than ever in the past. The talk will address some of the more relevant cardiovascular imaging modalities currently used to evaluate both normal development and disease processes.
Apr 3, 2014
Munzer

Photo of Jon Shah, MD, PhD
Jon Shah, MD, PhD

Prof., Neuroscience
RWTH Aachen Univ
Multimodal Simultaneous Imaging: Advances in MR-PET-EEG 3T and 9.4T in Humans

Abstract
The aim of my presentation is twofold: Firstly, to explore the potential of simultaneously acquiring multimodal MR-PET-EEG data in a human 9.4T scanner to provide a platform for metabolic brain imaging; here, data from a 3T MR-PET as well as the 9.4T will be presented. Secondly, to demonstrate that the three modalities are complementary, with MRI having the potential to provide excellent structural and functional imaging, PET providing quantitative molecular imaging, and EEG providing superior temporal resolution.

A 9.4T MRI scanner equipped with a PET insert and a commercially available EEG device were used to acquire in vivo proton-based images, spectra, and sodium- and oxygen-based images with MRI; EEG signals from a human subject in a static 9.4T magnetic field; and demonstrate hybrid MR-PET capability in a rat model.

High-resolution images of the in vivo human brain with an isotropic resolution of 0.5mm and post mortem brain images of the cerebellum with an isotropic resolution of 320µm will be presented. A 1H spectrum was also acquired from 2x2x2mm voxel in the brain allowing 12 metabolites to be identified.  Imaging based on sodium and oxygen will be demonstrated with isotropic resolutions of 2mm and 5mm, respectively. Preliminary data from auditory evoked potentials measured in a static field of 9.4T will also be shown.  Finally, hybrid MR-PET capability at 9.4T in the human scanner will be demonstrated in a rat model. Initial progress on the road to 9.4 T multimodal MR-PET-EEG will be illustrated. Ultra-high resolution structural imaging, high-resolution images of the sodium distribution and proof-of-principle 17O data will be presented. Further, simultaneous MR-PET data without artefacts and EEG data acquired at 9.4 T will be shown.
May 1, 2014
Munzer

Photo of Guanghong Chen, PhD
Guanghong Chen, PhD

Prof., Med Phys
Univ of Wisc, Madison
Title TBD

Abstract
TBD
Sept 4, 2014
Munzer

Title TBD

Abstract
TBD
Oct 2, 2014
Munzer

Title TBD

Abstract
TBD
Nov 6, 2014

Photo of John Haaga, MD
John R. Haaga, MD

Prof, Rad
CWRU School of Medicine
Title TBD

Abstract
TBD
Dec 4, 2014
Munzer

Title TBD

Abstract
TBD

Sponsored by: Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) (mips.stanford.edu);
Host: Director, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD (sgambhir@stanford.edu)

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